Our 15th webcast where we discuss Drone Cinematography.

 

 

On this episode of Crew Talk, we discuss drone cinematography with the people that fly cameras for Hollywood as well as for commercial projects. Have you added yourself as a resource in our production community? If so, we’ll be giving away a $100 prize to whoever is at the top of the home page leaderboard on Dec 1st.

 

Justin McAleece:

My name is Justin McAleece. This is Crew Talk, and we are here for Shoots.Video. So that’s the website that enables us to do all this great stuff. So yeah, we are talking about aerial today, drone operators and all that stuff. And so we have we have Jaron Denson up in the left-hand corner. Yeah, there we go. Chris Schuster. How do you, how do you say it, Chris Schuster? Yeah, I figured. Jamie Goodwick. Grant Gulesserian and Tony Carmean. I have not been able to do my homework today. Sorry about that guys. Anyway, I’m super psyched to have you guys on the show today and to be able to talk about yeah, what we do in the sky and, and sort of how it’s evolved over the years, how complicated it was for a while. Certainly. and how it’s sort of getting easier and complicated at the same time. At least that’s my experience. If you guys want to give me sort of like the quick rundown, just of you know, your name, where you are, what you do, that sort of thing, like 30 seconds each, then we’ll do that. I’ll start with you Jaren.

Jaron Denson:

Hey, okay. Everybody. well, I started life as an aeronautical engineer. Probably back in 2010, working for the DOD building, the next generation of drones then secret clearances, the whole nine yards. It was really fun. And then I kind of found out what the government was up to and decided to start my own company and go into aerial production. So once that happened, I think I started in like 2013, kind of like two feet in each camp, DOD work and starting a company. And then about by 2015, I think I was kind of one of the first waves on the three 33 exemption having my pilot’s license. And then about 2014, 2015. So about 2015 is kind of when I quit my day job and started pursuing this.

Justin McAleece:

Yeah. So you’re legitimate. And you’ve seen it from both sides of the curtain, I guess. That’s, that’s pretty neat. Chris, yeah. Tell me about what you, what you what you do, how you got started in this, Chris.

Chris Schuster:

Oh boy, I’ve been I came in as a hobbyist and I, and I saw an opportunity. I had a couple of job offers to fly for other like drone slash helicopter, cinema, cinematography companies back in the I guess that was the early nineties, I guess it was the early to mid nineties. Wow. And you know, then I was, I was in, in another industry, I was admitted. They didn’t, they weren’t gonna pay me what I thought I needed to make. And then that, that was back in the day when the helicopter, it was all single rotor, helicopter, everything ran on fuel. There was no batteries. And then, you know, after that, you know, shortly, like in the what was it probably 2003 or 2004, when the lithium battery technology came to the forefront, I was kinda like, you know, I was in a different position in my life when I kind of saw the, the tech advantage with that. And you know, it went from building a custom lipo driven helicopter machine, building, a custom built camera, Mount, putting a Handycam on it and making a demo reel. Yeah. That’s awesome. Then from there, yeah.

Justin McAleece:

Crazy how much this stuff has evolved over the years. And, you know, just like, like you’re saying how much battery technology really is the linchpin for a lot of that stuff. It’s pretty remarkable. We have I got we were doing a shoot at a studio the other day, a couple of days ago. And the the person running the studio is like, Hey, I have these presents for you. She could, she had clearly gotten them from a previous client. There was a bunch of money. Anyway, there’s a little tiny drones. They’re like, literally that big, it sits in the remote. There’s like a little hatch for it. And it’s, it’s just, it’s like a postage stamp. It’s incredible what they can do these days and how small it is. And it still flies. I mean, it’s, it’s pretty nuts. Jamie, tell me a little bit about yourself.

Jamie Goodwick:

Yeah, no, I’m kind of the outlier everyone’s down in LA. I actually relocated to Portland, Oregon from San Diego four years ago. And when I moved up here, I kind of saw an opportunity for, for drone cause no one was really doing it in Portland and offering that kind of high high-grade aerial service. So started Portland drone four years ago. And I’ve been really fortunate to kind of be the go-to provider in a very small market. But, but still offering, you know, top rate stuff, Netflix, HBO really whoever’s coming into town.

Justin McAleece:

Nice. Yeah. That’s cool, man. It’s, there’s definitely we’ll, we’ll get into that a little bit more later, but you know, the difference between the very top end and sort of low end and the lowest end, there’s a difference there, but top end and middle end, it’s sorta hard to tell sometimes. And I think that’s happened in within other types of cameras too, you know, just normal video production, but we’ll definitely get into that a little bit more Grant. Yeah. Tell me about yourself, man.

Grant Gulesserian:

Yeah. the journey started with actually film photography in high school and just kept growing with that and led to video and digital film or digital photography. And then back in 2014, I started flying a Phantom with a GoPro camera and everything was separate. You know, the technology was way different from what it is now and just kept growing with that. And slowly but surely I kept getting calls by clients to start doing aerial work and yeah, it’s led to where I am today and couldn’t be happier.

Justin McAleece:

Yeah, that’s cool, man. It’s if we always, we all take a different route to get where we want to go, hopefully, and then once we get there, we find out we want to go somewhere else. That’s, that’s the Genesis of every story, right. Every you’ve ever seen. Right. You finally get what you want and you feel as it’s not what you wanted after all. So yeah, it’s cool to hear everyone’s story. Tony hit me up. What’s up?

Tony Carmean:

Name’s Tony [inaudible], I’m one of the original founders of a company called aerial mob. I’m actually business partners with Chris Schuster. We compliment each other very nicely. I’m an outlier in the fact that I don’t fly drones. I have flown a little bit, but I’m more of the business. I run the business side, handle all the clients, producer, that kind of stuff. Original founder, very mild, a little over eight years ago. Chris has company called vortex, Ariel and Ariel mob. My company we’re part of the original six, if you will. That wrote the three 33 exemption. We became friends over the years and I’m actually kind of strategic partners in the last couple of years, sharing crew sharing ideas, that kind of stuff. Even though we were competitors, we call ourselves frenemies. We’re friendly with a lot of always we always talked about wow, maybe one day, it makes sense to put the two companies together and August 1st of last year we, we merged the two companies. Two brands are still intact because those are the forward facing brands in the industry. You know, all the studios know us and but no Chris owns the operation side. I run the business side and yeah, we we’ve grown the nice little company and I’m glad to be a part of this this.

Justin McAleece:

Yeah, that’s neat. It, you know, I mean the more I the more time I spent in production, the more I realized how important having those friends within the industry are, and keeping friends with as many people as you possibly can as many companies as you can and trying to go at it together. I think there’s enough work around there for the people that are capable of doing that work, whatever that happens to be that it’s best just to make friends and try to keep those relationships. I that’s, that’s how I’ve always operated. Jaron, tell me for someone out there today who maybe just has you know, a $500, $200 drone, something like that. Get something for Christmas. Tell me a little bit about like, how to get up to a level of being able to get paid to shoot something.

Jaron Denson:

Oh, geez. I mean, it’s practice and muscle memory. I would say, you know, if, if I had to give any advice to people who were starting out, I’d actually say, find a friend and start flying with a friend and probably buy something that you can afford and start flying do a lot, because anything in Hollywood, anything that’s high level, it’s all gotta be, do a lot. And the problem I have when I tried to hire pilots in the past, they’ve been like, you know, they’ve been stuck with their head in the monitor the whole time. And then I asked them to go ahead and film with another person and they can’t keep their eye on the drone and you know, fly third person. They can only fly in the hood, which presents problems on some rigs. And so I kinda just tell people to start getting used to flying third person a lot.

Jaron Denson:

So if you got a $500 drone, that’s great. That’s a great one to practice FPV on. And it’s also a great one to start practicing third person view, which is just looking at the drone, flying it as if you’re looking at it and not trying to fly it through the camera. And then partner up with somebody gets something that can, you know, has independent camera control from the drone. So you can start understanding those moves. And really, I think a lot of it comes from, you know, people ask me, it’s like, well, anybody can fly a drone. And I fully agree. I can teach anybody to fly a drone and less than 10 minutes, but, you know, I can also teach somebody to drive a car in 10 minutes, but not everybody, not everybody can, you know, when the Indianapolis 500. So, and then plus you set etiquette to thing too. So there’s, there’s a few facets, but that’s my best advice to somebody getting started.

Justin McAleece:

Yeah, that’s a good point. And, and I have always been, you know the main one that started out with the inspire one, I haven’t been around as long as most of you guys doing it, but I much prefer flying with two people. You know, if I can just keep my eye on the drone and I’m only paying attention to that, basically I prefer that way. And I think that 99 times out of a hundred, the better shot is if, when there’s two people and when I’m able to have them helping me and they can point and I can move and that works best for me. So yeah, I’d fully agree with what you’re saying. It’s like, it’s best to be able to at least be comfortable with the dual operator situation.

Jaron Denson:

Absolutely. Anything high level. That’s what it’s going to be at. Also too. I’ve been working my camera operators, my business partner. I’ve been working with him exclusively for seven years. So me and him have seven years of just, we don’t like have other crews where we like mix people around, you know, we get people set up and we keep them together because you develop synergy over time and, you know, he knows what I’m thinking and I know what he’s thinking. So if you’re really sick, that’s my best advice start doing doo-wop as soon as possible.

Justin McAleece:

Yeah, yeah, totally true. And I mean, there’s a, there’s such a smoothness of knowing basically it’s a lot like other filmmaking it’s like, there’s only so many ways to skin a cat or whatever you would say, right. There’s only so many ways to shoot a car. There’s only so many ways to cover a scene. I mean, in general, you’re going to be doing similar stuff most of the time. And so dialing that in and having a really shorthand easy way to go about it with your director or with the other person you’re working with, or whoever happens to be is like that cuts out a lot of time. Makes it a lot easier. Yeah. Chris what special skill do you need to develop? Is there something that, that takes a long time, or tell me about the learning curve a little bit?

Chris Schuster:

Well, to speak more to Jaron’s point definitely, you know, a certain degree of people skills and you’re gonna, you know, you’re definitely gonna want to be able to walk hand in hand with your with your camera operator or your pilot as a case, maybe. I mean, case in point, my, my camera operator that I work with on, on cause we, we have, we have, we got like five or six teams and, and I’m, I’m, even though I manage all of them, I’m, I’m one of the team pilots and command. And and my camera operator has been with me for 14 years, since 2007. Yeah. The very beginning of vortex aerial. And and he, this, this gentleman, Matt is his name he’s really, really, really good with the client. And, you know, being, being able to, being able to have a guy on your team that can, you know, talk the talk and walk the walk.

Chris Schuster:

It’s really good if they’re, if they’re already guys that are already in the union, you know, when people people know them and, you know, the, the, the producers, when they, when they look him up on the roster, they find them on the experience roster. And it just makes everybody feel that much better. You know what I’m saying? Yeah, it can be kind of a steep get in to get into the union, but that’s a, you know, ultimately that’s really the best place to be. So you’d probably have, you know, for, for a new guy, it’s like, yeah, learn your chops, learn how to fly your drone, but you’re probably gonna want to get into the camera Guild.

Justin McAleece:

Interesting. Yeah. I mean, that’s the goal for a lot of people and it is not an easy thing to do depending, especially depending on your market. I think, you know, that’s there, there’s definitely a level there to where if you want to do that stuff, you’re gonna need going to need to be at that level for most things, especially down in LA when you’re working on union gigs, normal movie type stuff. For sure. So

Chris Schuster:

All of our pilots in command are our local 600 directors or photography. And all, all of our, all of our, all of our camera operators are either directors of photography or their their camp, their camera operators, and our, and a lot of the majority of our, of our visual observers are our camera technicians.

Justin McAleece:

Yeah. And I think that’s crucial because it’s just because someone can play a video game, which is, you know, it’s sort of like just using a joystick or whatever on a video game, a controller that doesn’t mean that, you know, what a good shot looks like. I mean, those are two completely different back back to Jared’s point. Yeah. You still gotta be able to frame like composition is the main thing that you’re worried about and, you know, obviously exposure and white balance and other things like that, depending on how much you’re setting, but that’s, stuff’s crucial. And if you don’t have just, just getting someone who can point really well doesn’t mean a whole lot of, they don’t know what they’re trying to point at. So yeah, that’s definitely my experience as well. Hey, Jamie, tell me what’s the difference between a regular drone and a FPV drone? What are we talking?

Jamie Goodwick:

Yeah, of course. And I’m actually curious to see what the guys in LA are doing with the FPV drones, but now I don’t know if you call it a regular drum, but you know, we’re, we’re flying, you know, it might be, do a lap quad, copters update, you know, a play it’s kind of going up there and then the FEVS are the ones you’re throwing, you know, for people that see drones from a further out range, you’re putting the thing over your face and you’re flying it kind of like a rollercoaster almost to be well again, that kind of rollercoaster footage of, of where you’re going. So I, I, you know, I’m personally, I’m actually just starting to get into that whole Seanna whoop, you know, getting those kind of inquiries. I’m really curious to hear about what the other guys have to have to say to that.

Jamie Goodwick:

They’re incorporating that into other business, but there is a trend certainly going that way. You’re seeing a lot of production companies contracting out. It could be some of the guys that are in the room right now that are throwing reds, you know, on these little skinny whoops. And, and getting some crazy cool footage and kind of to echo what you said before that, not to challenge it, but you know, the, the idea that you can only get kind of get one car shot or they’re all kind of the same. That’s where the whole FPV thing is kind of coming in and changing up that, that play. There was a, there was a car commercial possible. One of these guys shot it that I saw this morning. It was a scenario up that literally was flying at the car car was coming straight at it. And then it rotated 10 80 and flew into the back passenger window while driving into the dash crazy shot. So there, I mean, like, you know, I think one of the crazy things about drones is you’re starting to see productions replace things like dollies and, and much larger pieces of equipment with, you know, very affordable you know, high quality drones. So while there might be the perspective where you’re flying at 400 feet and that’s all drones do, it’s like totally the opposite. Cause some of the best shots you’re going to get are five feet above the ground, you know? So so yeah, I know that kind of branched off a little bit.

Justin McAleece:

That’s okay. I mean, yeah. Does anyone else want to speak to that? It described to us sort of what he’s talking about in a little more layman’s terms, what’s in a cinema, that sort of stuff. What’s, what’s the difference? What does FPV even mean? Anyone want to hop in?

Jaron Denson:

I’ll take it if nobody else wants to go for it. Okay. yeah. So at PV means first person view. So basically what people are doing is they’re building these racing drones that are small informed factor and they’re attaching cameras to them with most times no stabilization. So you have a very small form factor, which is very, very quick and very fast. They have usually really low run times. And what somebody does is they literally sit there with goggles on and all they see is what the drone sees. And then you usually, the camera is fixed in such a position. That kind of what they’re seeing through the FPV is kind of what the camera is seeing. And then in post, they go ahead and stabilize it and do whatever they need to do. Some I’ve seen some with little gimbals on them that maybe have a roll and pitch access on their tables.

Jaron Denson:

But most times they’re kind of fixed to me, I, we did a little bit of it. It’s not my thing to me. It’s very, I dunno, I don’t want to sound dogmatic. It’s just very spastic in nature and shots are like very quick and they’re very fast. And I just, I can’t really wrap my head around too much. I like things that are cinematic. I like things that you know are fast, but a lot of what I see, I worked on like formula drift, which is all like racing stuff. And there’s this guy, I remember his name something FPV, Johnny FPV, very, very talented guy can fly all around the car, but it’s just like, after watching it, I kind of feel dizzy. He has a place and a lot of cars shoots. I’m starting to show up on, they have our team and then they have an FPV team.

Justin McAleece:
Oh, okay. So it would be a dual situation.

Jaron Denson:

Yeah. So they’re going to get different shots from different people and I’m not, I’m not skilled enough at this point to sell myself as an FPV PI I can do it. It’s just not, I can’t do it at that level.

Justin McAleece:

That’s a, that’s a whole nother level of things. I mean, it’s like being an Acrobat or something. It’s like, yeah, I can go do pull-ups that doesn’t make me an Acrobat. You know, it doesn’t make me a gymnast or whatever it happens to be. It’s a, yeah, that takes more, I wouldn’t say it takes more training. It definitely takes different trainings.

Jaron Denson:

Yeah. Yeah. And you’re relying on one person and you know, like, it’s cool. I’ve seen a lot of really great shots, like coming down, building faces. They can also do things that are getting the camera in different angles than standard drones or whatever you want to call cinematic journals is what I was called them. You know, where the cameras generally level at all times. And, you know, we’re, we’re flying pretty much for, or, you know what I mean? The camera’s kind of limited to what it can do, right. But with the FPV drones, they can go seriously, just looking straight down and then they can pull off of the road and then they can come into their object of interest, which is a car or an actor. So they are different, completely different shots that I think do have a place I’m not going to dog them like that. I just, I’m not any onward.

Tony Carmean:

We were seeing, we had a shoot that was on that we had literally Criswell was at nine or 10 drones in the band over a Ford commercial. I’m not sure if you guys saw the world series, but that ranges everything from ultra every lifter that we have a drone that can look up to about 24 pound camera package all the way down to, we had a half dozen FPV drones. And if you look at the footage, they have a six minute long, almost a six minute long version of it. And you can see to tell the difference. FPV drones definitely brings a different flavor and energetic. I kept saying, I want high energy for these shots.

So that’s where the FPV kind of fell in. Yeah.

Justin McAleece:
Well, if, if the new Hummers, any like anything like the old one, you need a lot of energy to move it.

Justin McAleece:

Yeah, I know it’s crazy. And, and it’s, you know, it’s like anything in filmmaking, it’s the difference between having it on a, a gimble or a steady cam or something like that, or having it on a tripod, it changes the whole way you’re doing it. And I think too, you know, I’m primarily a cinematographer, not a drone operator and you know, you don’t necessarily want to draw attention to what you’re doing. It depends on the type of project, but if you’re talking about more narrative stuff, it’s like, your job is not to be like, Hey, look at this shiny shot. Your job is to be like, tell the story, stick to the narrative, you know, try to accomplish these goals within these characters. And so FPV might not be a great solution for that, but it might be a really good solution for a couple of things.

Justin McAleece:

So you never know there’s that shot in fight club. If you guys remember a couple where it goes, like all the way through buildings and then down through other things, like you could do that with an FPV these days basically, and not have to build the whole thing in Maya or whatever it could be pretty cool anyway. Yeah. Getting grant anything to talk about that, like w what new uses are you seeing for drones and have you, have you changed much of what you’ve been doing or are you still sticking to what works?

Grant Gulesserian:

I’m mostly sticking to what works in the cinematography field. A lot of the jobs I get are with, you know, like an inspire two setups but I have been getting more inquiries about SPVs. And for the most part, you know, GoPro cameras are, are able to capture that unique look if they need a quick shot, but I know reds are, are a huge part of that too, where, you know, if the client does need something higher quality, they are asking for, you know, for higher quality cameras, whether they’re DSLRs or mirrorless cameras on FTV setups. But for the most part, for me, I’ve been focusing just, you know, on the cinematography side with you know, inspire twos and you know, heavy lift copters.

Justin McAleece:

Sure. Yeah. And it’s crazy how good an image and inspired two can get. I mean, it really does, you know, for, for certain uses a lot of uses. It’s really great. So yeah, totally. So there’s a thing called LAANC. Do you guys know what that means at all? Do people need to care about that at all? If they’re getting into drone work,

Chris Schuster:
It’s an acronym for pain in the butt.

Justin McAleece:

Exactly. LA must be terrible. Tell me, someone tell me like five years ago, putting up a drone, how many rules there were compared to today putting up a drone. I got to take that out. Yeah.

Chris Schuster:

It’s got it’s overall it’s much, much better. I mean like, like Tony spoke to originally, he and I were originally on the on the NPAA FAA task team that brought drones into, into a legal space. Not that not that they hadn’t already been being used for probably almost 15 or 20 years prior to that. But when, when we first had, as we helped write the rules, what eventually came down as the FAA basically made their own call on a lot of things. And and initially it was extremely restrictive, extremely restrictive. And and it stayed that way for probably three years. And then one Oh seven came out and once the one Oh seven rules came out, it got a lot better. It opened up the door for a lot of other people to come into the industry, which is good and it was bad.

Chris Schuster:

But the, the whole, the whole blank system is, is basically just way for local airports to kind of keep drone guys out of the traffic lane for the most part that’s that’s, that’s, that’s ultimately what it really all about. Ultimately it’s, it’s been, we, we all, we all work off of off of a, a big map called a facility map. And and that map, you know, has every airport pretty much, if you ever take, you know, in the United States maps out on it, and it tells you how high you can fly your drone for a given distance from the center of that airport. And, you know, and then if you want to do extra things, like, you know, fly inside of one of these geographical locations that says you can only go to 300 feet, but you need to, you know, you need to go a little bit higher than that.

Chris Schuster:

Then you can apply for paperwork through the FAA and just pray that, you know, you get that paperwork on time before your shoot goes away. But for the most part, you know, it gives you, it gives you quite a bit of leeway, you know, to get, to get what you needed to get done done. If you want to fly at night, that’s a whole different thing. You know, if you want to fly at night near these airports, I take a whole different, you know, set of paperwork to do that kind of thing. But, but it’s essentially, you know, it, there’s an online portal that you can go to, you know, and you can fill out paperwork and you can get, you can get authorization notes, but it says that you can pass on to the producer so that he can give it to his insurance guys, you know, and they get a film from it and, you know, go, go through all that, that all, all those motions. But it’s basically it’s, I w it was, it was all set up by the FAA and the department of transportation’s and it’s all about basically just control it’s air, traffic control, near airports for the most part. Yeah.

Justin McAleece:

Yeah, exactly. And so you guys all took the test, you guys all passed the test. Just tell me a little bit about this stuff for someone who’s never taken it or never studied for it, like what’s on there that you don’t necessarily know needs to be on there stuff that’s carried over from actual pilot stuff. Tell me a little bit about that.

Chris Schuster:
So you’re referring to the one Oh seven pilots license. Yeah,

Justin McAleece:

Yeah, yeah. So, so from your point of view, and maybe it’s different from a lot of people, like more consumer consumer centric, people getting into it, but like how the readout, how did determine the weather and stuff like that, based on reading all the codes. Tell me a little bit about that, because they’re going to get tested on that, right.

Chris Schuster:

If you’re just fresh in the gate and you’ve never had any kind of aircraft on pilot’s license, then yeah. They’re going to ask you whether questions and you have to, you’re going to have to read like coded information called me tars, and then decipher what those mean?

Justin McAleece:
Do you think that’s necessary for running a drone?

Chris Schuster:

Not to the degree, not, not in that, not, not that particular space as far as weather goes. And to, to that, you know, once you’ve cleared that hurdle and, and answer those questions and got yourself a license from then on out, you have to redo your license every two years and all those crazy weather questions go away after that. Oh, I didn’t realize that that changed. You only got a, you only got to hit the high hurdle once, and as long as you take her and after that every two years, then, you know, the hurdle is a little bit low. It’s not a hell of a lot lower, but it’s lower. Yeah.

Justin McAleece:
That’s neat. I actually didn’t realize that at all. That’s pretty

Chris Schuster:
Cool. Yeah. There’s actually less questions on the test. Yeah.

Justin McAleece:
Crash and hurt anything. Yeah. No,

Chris Schuster:

It’s all fresh in my mind because me and my entire team just became recurrent for, I think the third time around. Wow. Just like a week and a half ago.

Justin McAleece:
Okay. Yeah. Yeah. All right. So you’ve taken it multiple times and you understand that process. Yeah.

Chris Schuster:

They were all pilots to begin with back in initially when we were all three, three, three, and it sounds like Jaron could probably speak to this. We all had to get pilots licenses to one degree or the other, either a sport or a fixed wing, or, you know, anybody, anybody that on our panel here that had a three 33 exemption would know that. Yeah.

Justin McAleece:

Yeah, totally. What we’ll get a little more general for a second. Like what do you think people overuse or underuse drone footage? I imagine you guys have a a vested interest to say under you, is there something, but give it to me straight in, in productions these days,

Jamie Goodwick:

I think with kind of going back to your, you know, your role in cinematography and where the drone plays in that role, you’re seeing a lot of Netflix’s that do use it a lot is establishing shots, but you’re also seeing a lot of shows, not even touch them, because maybe it’s just, it’s not fitting in with their storytelling. And, you know, when you, when you, when you start to produce something like that, you know, the conversations are coming in and it’s like, do we need, do we even need aerials for the shot? I think that the cooler application, rather than the 400 foot application, like I mentioned before, maybe where you’re getting establishing shots and all of that is those cool tracking shots where maybe your, you know, recreating a golf cart or something that, or a Dolly or whatever. And those are the type of applications that I think drones are useful for replacing right now.

Justin McAleece:

And I think it’s probably a situation too. It’s like, you know, they they’ve always said when there’s good CG, you don’t realize it’s CG and you know, a David Fincher. I remember watching this stuff of gone girl, or what was it? Wall street Wolf of wall street. It’s like, there was so much stuff that was just faking. You had, you would have never thought it cause like, why would you fake that? A lot of that stuff. And so drones are probably getting a little bit more into that situation. Like you guys were talking about using them for dollies or whatever. It’s like, you didn’t even realize that was a drone, but it was the best way to do it on set. So it’s not showy, but it still works. Anyone else want to weigh in on that?

Tony Carmean:

Yeah. One of our biggest challenges in early going back five, six Years ago, just right after the three 33 exemption was not only getting the studios and production companies comfortable with the regulatory and what you can and can’t do in terms of the FAA compliance. But the second wave and Chris and I had many conversations over the years about this is the creative people, because first thing people think, Oh, you replaced a helicopter. Well, that really, that couldn’t be further from the truth. Do we do helicopter shots? Yes, but we’re limited to 400 feet. And my mantra for the last five years is trying to get the directors to realize how you use this. And you can see the light bulb go off on set. All of a sudden I can, somebody alluded to, you can get Dolly shots, crane shots, gypped shots, Russian arm, car shots. You can combine them all into one shot. And we’re just seeing the last two years where directors say, Oh, I get it.

Tony Carmean:

Hey, guess what? We don’t need that Russian arm car that day after all. And it’s a multi-use tool. And it took a while again for the creative. And it’s not like it’s done it’s in life in life. Nothing’s really done. You’re always just trying to get better. But the point being that the creatives in the industry are really starting to get a handle on. Okay. Wow. And we’re doing it at somebody you had mentioned Justin about using drones for, you know, different VFX kind of work. We’re doing a lot of plate work as a way. But yeah, the, the multi-use, it was something that again, we had to educate the, the community a little bit for the first few years.

Justin McAleece:

Totally. And have you guys done it, you guys have done real estate stuff very much.

Tony Carmean:
We never did. Chris, did you ever?

Chris Schuster:

Actually, when when vortex Ariel first got started, it actually vortex aerial was, had actually been in business since Oh my gosh. Like 1996, Whoa, Hey, way, way back. And and when I, when I got on board, then all they were doing was realtor stuff and they were making photos and and I brought the video element into it and, and, and got it all going that way. And then as things started to go, I just, I just bought everybody out, went off. I didn’t, I didn’t share a vision with them. I’m just like, you know, you guys don’t know what you’re doing. You’re still back in the stone age with realtors and stuff. It’s X amount of dollars. Just give me the, give me the name and the branding and I’m out of here. And and it just went from there. We, we used to go do the real estate thing. Yup. Yeah. He used to pay the bills

Justin McAleece:
And there’s no shame in that. It’s just, it’s interesting, you know,

Chris Schuster:
You, what we were charging, there was no shame in it.

Justin McAleece:

Yeah, yeah, yeah. It’s it. I think some people see it like shooting weddings, you know, as a videographer, that’s sort of something that some people have to deal with and they are like never again, and then some people, you know, make a living out of it and that’s great. But, but it’s interesting to see how you guys all get to where you are today. A couple of years. Well, for one thing I got to, we are going to do a $50 gift card giveaway at the end that’s B&H photo gift card at the end of the, the the show today. So that’ll be fun. And until then, so hang out for that. But until then grant, tell me what some of your favorite footage you’ve gotten. What’s, what’s some of the best things you shot?

Grant Gulesserian:

I had a project actually in Armenia where I went and captured like all the monuments churches from like, from thousands of years ago for us, for, you know, from throughout the country and all these places for a book a photo book that is going to be released in about a year. And yeah, it was just such a unique experience that there was a lot of cool shots we were able to capture there. And right now we’re selling prints to raise money for the war that’s going on over there. Very cool. Yeah. So it’s a, it’s called Arial armenia.com. You guys can check it out. There’s a couple of prints on there where a hundred percent of the proceeds go to the Armenia fund for all the people living in that region. But yeah, so another cool aspect of another really interesting job I had was for a truck night in America for a history channel, which, you know, we were flying drones for 45 days straight, just like it was all just tracking cars off-roading trucks. And those are some like the funnest, like amazing shots that we were getting, we were able to get in the mud and the dirt. So those were definitely some of the coolest shots I’ve I’ve gotten.

Justin McAleece:

Yeah. It’s you do feel, I mean, what I do in with drone stuff, you feel lucky to be able to have that job sometimes you’re like, eh, this is, this doesn’t really feel like a job, their job aspects to it, but like, come on. This is pretty good.

Grant Gulesserian:
Yeah. It was, it was really sweet for sure.

Justin McAleece:

You have a Armenian last name. Are you, is that your heritage or yes. Yeah. Yeah. That’s great, man. That you found a way to you know, be able to give back to that cause and be able to get some really incredible footage in the process and stills. Who else, who else wants me to tell me about once? Tell me about some of their favorite footage.

Chris Schuster:

We did, the thing is six. My mind is we did it that the mule with Clint Eastwood. Oh yeah. I, to I got to, I got to fly right alongside Clint Eastwood. He was the actual precision driver. Nice. I was the drone pilot and and we, we worked together and we coordinated all the moves in the, in the, in that film. That’s super cool. That was really memorable. Tony, right, right. Before we merged Tony’s crew did a Hobbs and Shaw in Hawaii and got all that crazy, crazy stuff with Dwayne Johnson and all those really neat plates they did on that and all that, all that crazy. How long were they there for Tony a month? And some

Chris Schuster:

It was about a 30 day shoot, but Not to interject, but I think the coolest shot on the era mob side of things, again, Chris and I, the marriage happened to August 1st, last year. So there was some history war area with area mob. And one of my business partners around the time was also one of our lead pilots. Not sure if you guys saw it, but the opening two minute piece of one of the opening seasons of openers of dancing with the stars, one content two minute shot talking about different uses of drones. Well, we, everybody asks, there’s no way you did that in one, one take once you, well, we did, but I also tell them it took three days of rehearsal on a football field in San Fernando Valley, but it was a live shot at a two minute continuous shot started off as kind of a Dolly shot with a check crane shot. And, and we got a lot of, a lot of attention in the industry after that hit, because it was so unique and kind of unbelievable.

Justin McAleece:

Wow. Yeah. That’s funny. And some of the trickiest things we did or the inspire one, and then it’s like a lot of times you’re like, Oh man, it’d be really cool to do this. And then you’d sort of move past it and work on a, you know, more traditional stuff. Maybe, I don’t know, this is how it works. A lot of times with the toys we get. Yeah. Anyone else want to weigh in on that? And then I’ll start taking some questions from the the people here watching

Jaron Denson:

I would just say I love automotive. That’s like my favorite thing to shoot. We cut our teeth filming, like race series and stuff like that. And one of the things that we just did was with Ferrari and obviously can’t the commercial hasn’t dropped for it, but I I’ve come to really appreciate because Netflix forced us to do a lot of like interesting winners, which is just like a really long coordinated shot. That’s like two minutes long or something, not to the level of the dancing with the stars opening. I should remember seeing that now. Like, yeah, whenever that was. I remember seeing that and going like, wow, that was really, really good. But it’s fun, man. I, I like being challenged, you know, cause I’m an engineer. So like problem solving is like what I’d love to do. People come to me with the problem.

Jaron Denson:

And they’re like, okay, this is how we’re going to do it. How do we do this part? And it’s really fun, you know, especially with the inspire too. I think there’s like I try and convince people that it’s like, I can create more dynamic movements. We can do more things than I have you lift their craft. We have a heavy lift aircraft, but it’s like, you can catch the thing. You can fly it in. You can fly really close to things. People, cars, you know, you can get a lot closer than I’m comfortable with, with something that’s like basically a flying lawnmower, carbon fiber plates, you know, when you get up into the Altus and stuff like that. And I don’t know. I just, I just love a challenge. Anybody. Who’s got a challenge for me. I’m like, it’s just, it’s just something about me that wants to prove that I can do it.

Jaron Denson:

So yeah, I kind of like, I’m kind of becoming more and more fond of oners and I really appreciate when people bring those to us to do different things. Like what else did we do? We, we built, we built a camera car similar to a taro by free fly, but we did an all wheel drive one. And so we got something that runs on the ground. And then we started doing, saw somebody put lights on an Alto. So we ended up just doing a music video with lights on the Elta and then speakers through LA during the riots or not the riots during COVID and you know, just like different stuff. I just like people to bring it like a technology technological challenge or just a skills challenge. I there’s like one shot that we couldn’t show. Cause it was like, what was that?

Jaron Denson:

Like 2014 or 2015? That was 2015. One, one of my most, one of our best shots we’ve ever done really long winter was supposed to be the opening to one direction music video, right before the little boys decide to have a whatever. And it was just like the sickest one or opening to a music video. Nobody had actually really done anything at that level at that time. And then something happened where they all fell out and the music would have never dropped. And it was like, no. Yeah, it was just so horrible.

Justin McAleece:

Yeah. No that’s okay. That’s good. We have a question from Robin and she was asking what’s the worst weather conditions you flown in? Do you fly in any inclement weather? What’s the situation there? Is everyone sort of coating rain or, or is that

Chris Schuster:

Long enough? Has flown in all kinds of crazy stuff? It knows it doesn’t, it doesn’t take long if you’re going to, you’re going to stay in the game for more than a year and a half or so. And you’re going to be even remotely consistently busy. You’re going to fly in weather.

Justin McAleece:
Have you had problems with gear breaking down because of that?

Chris Schuster:

Actually yes. Yes we have. And it’s been a rather dramatic, but yeah, we fly drones in the rain. The drone is going to come down. If you keep pushing your luck. Yeah. Also

Grant Gulesserian:

Colder weather too. Your batteries are not going to last as long. And West snow is never great. Yeah, absolutely.

Justin McAleece:

They give you those little with the inspires. They give them a little, a little like rubber things. You just put on the side and like that. And then if you don’t use them, you might need extra hand warmers to keep them going. Yeah, totally. I’ve I’ve been there for sure. What were you gonna say, Jerry?

Jaron Denson:

Yeah. Trick with that too. What do we have? We have like a small heating blanket. We throw in our Pelican when it, things are really cold. Yeah. what I was going to say, Oh, rain. The thing about rain is, is that flown in some rain and I can, you can kind of just try and get away with it between rain showers, but they want you to fight during the rain. And what happens is the lens gets fouled generally speaking. And I know that there’s some systems that go ahead and spin like a glass element in front of the lens, on the larger platforms. I’ve never flown anything really large and rain and flood inspires the rain. Also when really wind situations I’m comfortable flying and inspire Altos. They get blown around a little bit. So I don’t know anything about the ax, but the eight it’s kind of like a big old dinner plate up there. Kind of. Ooh.

Justin McAleece:

Yeah. I mean, it all depends on what tool you’re using for what specific job and how much money they’re spending and all that stuff. I mean, that’s sort of what it comes down with. Any camera package. Yeah. Interesting. What I’m was going to ask. Oh, any interesting crash stories. Any, anything anyone wants to share about crashing never happened, right.

Jaron Denson:
The most asked question on set.

Justin McAleece:

You ever crashed these things? Yeah. I don’t know anyone who has it. So I mean, that’s, that’s the thing. If anyone wants to share.

Chris Schuster:

We actually discussed this internally with, with our with all of our board members the other day and we try to keep our nose, our ear to the ground on that. You know, we talk, we pot, we talk to industry people and you know, people who insure industry people that you know, load locate locations like not location managers, but what do you call it? A site reps site rep, you know, for any, any given film studio you go out to or any given filming ranch, you might go out to and drones are going in every day. Wow. Literally going in every day, big ones, little ones, fast, one slow ones, guys that shouldn’t fly guys that have been flying for years. It’s just, it’s just part of the game. You know, you fly, you fly a drone, you stay, you stay in the game long enough. It’s going to happen to you. It’s just a matter of time. Sure. You know, it happens to us. It happens. I’m sure it’s happened to us, everybody here on this panel, at least once, you know, and it’s just, it’s just part of the game, you know?

Tony Carmean:

See what the FPV can almost kind of treat the FPV in some cases like crashed rooms because of the way the conditions and the kind of shot you’re getting with them are putting them in danger at all times. And that’s why we took five, five or six on that, on that Hummer spot Maul. Thank goodness.

Chris Schuster:

Yeah, we had one where the camera, what was it? Our pilot, our pilot came down from about 400 feet, straight down, dive into a forest where the, none of the trees were more than eight or 10 feet apart. And once he got down into the forest at speed, he had to find a line through a couple of practice runs and through muscle memory, he had to find a line through those trees and fly through that bulk of, of, of tree. And in the process took out two aircraft. Didn’t at one point, the camera was thrown almost 800 feet from drunk. Whoa. That’s how far that, that made me. Cause you’re going like seven miles an hour, 60, 70 miles an hour. It was on the side of an embankment. So the camera kind of like halfway, like got grown and then a run. We were talking to GoPro and and of the, the good part was that a thing was rolling the entire time and it didn’t ruin the video clip. So we actually got the clip. Oh, neat. Yeah, that’s fine.

Justin McAleece:

Yeah. Yeah. Unbelievable. I mean, those there it’s gonna happen. Like you’re saying you get in there long enough.

Chris Schuster:
Just like get another aircraft to get in the air now because we’re only gonna be here for an hour. Exactly.

Justin McAleece:
Tony question he says are you related to Harry Carmean a classical painter and draftsman?

Tony Carmean:

You know, I’ve been asked that question cause I have a kind of a unique that last name. You don’t see it too often. Yeah, not that I know of, but I’ve been asked that question several times of my life.

Justin McAleece:

Interesting. Must be a famous guy. Yeah. his question, how do you match the exposure and color tone of the drone footage with the rest of the footage taken by a more advanced ground camera? Don’t know if that’s the question for these guys? I think most of the people on this panel are probably running fairly high end cameras or at least things that could match pretty well. One thing that I would say when I used to run a inspire one is a lot of what we had to do is actually make the footage softer because it has like built in sharpness sharpness it’s way different than what you would get on a red, which is what the rest of the footage where matching was. So, you know, shooting at log to where you have a lot of information there to mess with. And then also, usually just making it softer. That helps a lot. Because most cinema cameras are not over sharpened. They’re just very high in resolution or apparent resolution. So that’s what I would say. Anyone else have ideas about that? I think that happiness.

Chris Schuster:

I mean, we always ask in advance, like what the, what the hero camera’s going to be. Yeah. We’ll try it. And then we’ll try to recommend a you know, a camera that’s that that’s going to match it as close as possible. Like typically what we’ll do is like, if, if they’re gonna, if they’re going to shoot on, on on any kind of an airy camera, we’ll usually believe it or not. We’ll recommend the 5 S cameras. Oh, okay. I will try to steer people away from the XF and the, but if they’re going to shoot on a RED, we’ll recommend the X7.

Justin McAleece:
Interesting. That’s a resolution or just the look overall sort of thing?

Chris Schuster:

Yes, exactly. Exactly. It’s an overall look and we just, we we’ve done, we’ve done umpteen because we have all these cameras in house. We’ve got an umpteen amount of real world tests. You know, they’re not, they’re not pixel P tests. Their tests were like, you know, you’re going to have to take this, this, this is the daily stuff, you know, that you’re gonna have to shoot people that are gonna have to hand it off. They may have to get it edited and put out the door the next day and they don’t have time to mess with it. So they needed to match as close as they can and do a minimum bending and pushing on it. I mean, you know, every now and then you’ll get, you you’ll get the bigger job where they have time, but you’d be surprised that even like feature films, they don’t have time to do a whole bunch of color correcting. They just don’t, you know, especially in your brain, your brain, you’re just a little, a little popcorn drone camera into the mix. So we we’ve, we, we try to, to approach it from that angle.

Justin McAleece:

Gotcha. another question here don’t mind, we gotta, we got a lot of questions today, so try to keep it moving. Do you see any use of drone for production location sound? This person says, I assume drone road or noise will make this sound unusable, but I’m curious that’s from Navi. Yeah. What, what do they do on set guys when you’re trying to record sound, make your land.

Grant Gulesserian:

Yeah, exactly. It’s it’s, it’s funny. We always onset with like the drone guys in the audio guys always have this funny I don’t know, like a constant conflict with each other, but it’s always, you know, fun and games because they’re always looking out for that drone sound and they can pick it up easily with their mic. So we always got to wait for that. So yeah,

Justin McAleece:

It’s a high noon shootout situation. They just see you coming down and they’re like, Oh yeah. I mean, I imagine on a lot of higher end things, there’s, there’s ADR. I mean, you know, when we’re talking about big movies and things like that, they’re doing they have all sorts of other stuff that we don’t see when we’re actually looking at the final image that is also making noise. They might have to have big fans or they might have to big mechanical things moving, all that stuff. And so they’re going to record a lot of that sound later, anyway, again automated, automated dialogue replacement, or additional dialogue recording or whatever you want to call it. That sort of stuff is going to happen on a lot of those sets. Those people are saying it, but that’s just more so that you sort of get an idea of what they’re saying so you can rerecord it.

Tony Carmean:

And there are guys and cutters companies out there. Chris, I haven’t told you about this, but we have a potential demo with a company on the 18th at they’re a New Zealand based company they had developed these protectors are around the props and not only did it protect people from injury, but that the it’s supposed to quiet the drone noise down to a level where it’s an audible. So you get past that noise part now, whether or not I’ve actually figured it out, I don’t know, but somebody can figure that out. That’s a big deal. But what we found in Kristen needed the rest of the guys who actually fly, could probably address this a little bit better than I can, but what we found as any solution that’s been brought up so far affects the performance of the drone also. So you got to weigh that and also, but Chris, yeah, I’ll fill you in later, but the 18th, it looks like we’re doing a demo for what the company that has these.

Chris Schuster:

Right? Yeah. The the all to X, the big, big quad copter with 33 inch propellers the quietest drone so far really neat. Yeah. And we’ve, we’ve done, we’ve done a couple of little proprietary to it to make it substantially quieter. And I would die. I would be confident in saying that you could probably, as long as you don’t need like super uber, crazy quiet, you know, you could probably have the thing like two or 300 feet away and, and, and roll and roll sound with it. It could, it could be out, it could be doing like, you know, some sort of an orbit around some sort of a dialogue situation. And you could, you could run everything altogether. You could run your sound and your audio and, and your, and the audio guy may have to run some sort of like a, I don’t know, like a, to 125 or 200 Hertz filter over it just to get that bit of the noise out.

Chris Schuster:

But it’s a, but there, and we we’ve, we’ve been experimenting, you know, we, we have, we got all kinds of customized stuff that we built in house and we, and we’re, we’re, we’re, we’re pretty hardcore into like propeller technologies and stuff like that, because it’s said that that’s really where all the noise comes from. It’s from the propellers and, you know, propel, the technology just keeps getting better especially, you know, for drones. And a lot of it’s getting, getting taken out of the, out of like the airline industry. And we’re, we’re, we’re working like the daily on that, you know, trying to keep the drones, you know, as quiet as possible because it, it, it, it opened, it actually, it’s a market that, that in and of itself is a, is a market. You know, if you can, you can, a lot of times why they don’t want to use a drone or an aircraft, you know, and they have to go to a crane is because it’s just that just going to make too much noise, you know? Yeah. So

Justin McAleece:

It’s cool. What they’re doing that technology just keeps marching on and, you know, allows us to do more creative things. That’s great. Jamie got a question from U R for you from Ryan says how does not living in a, how does living not in a major market affect your ability to get work and how do you overcome that? How do you get work, man? How do you get hired?

Jamie Goodwick:

Yeah, it’s a, you know, we’ve, we’ve been really fortunate, a lot of the naming convention. So our name, we just got Portland Toronto, as soon as we moved into town. So that alone with SEO has been amazing. We’re showing up first on Google. So when a production from London or New York, or, I mean, some folks are even going out from LA cause they can’t bring their guys. I mean, what’s happening right now is COVID is actually, I don’t know if you guys are seeing this because maybe you’re in LA. And a lot of the crews you’re working with are in LA, but we work with a lot of production companies from outside of Portland. So when they’re coming in now, especially with COVID, there’s their skeleton crew and they’re not bringing out their drone operators from a New York or wherever they’re coming from. They’re contracting folks in town locally. So I would hope because our market is so small in Portland at that trend kind of continues even once COVID is passed and they start relying on, you know, professionals in the markets that they’re going into because not only is that great for you know, for folks like myself, but it’s great for the local economy too. So you can, I’m sure these guys are like, of course wants work to go, come into there and get him hired. Cause we’ve had productions from LA come up. But it’s, it’s been really, it’s been really interesting that that dynamic right now with the skeleton crews coming in being able to be socially distance and and fly professionally. So the smaller market, that’s really just, you know, what, what chunk can you get? You gotta be professional and you gotta go out and do the work. You gotta be available, you gotta be transparent. And you know, if there’s anything that I recommend is integrity too. If you feel like you’re a really good operator business owner you know, and you feel like you can charge what you’re worth and do it don’t, don’t try to undercut the market. Don’t, you know, don’t try to do anything like that because you’re only gonna hurt yourself at the end of the day. So, you know, just be approved, be proud of the stuff that you’re doing and, and, and you know, just continue to work hard, honestly, in the smaller markets,

Justin McAleece:

It seems like good notes in the markets. Yeah. Chris I’ll second that. It makes sense anywhere you’re working, even in a large market.

Jamie Goodwick:

Sure. It must be hyper competitive for you guys down there. I mean, I I’m sure some of you guys are probably taking jobs from each other, but, but alluding back to you know, the very beginning of this conversation, we’re talking about drone pilots as a, as a whole and being representatives on our community. I mean, we’re all working together. There’s forums, there’s, there’s tons of, you know, there’s just been so much help that I have, you know, reached out to forums personally, guys that are working in Boston or New York or LA or whatever. I mean, the, the, the industry as a whole, as it is the drone industry, UIs industries has been just so great to be a part of. I feel like everyone’s in it together and everyone’s working together. I don’t think there’s like too many people that you don’t like. And every everyone’s just trying to help out because at the end of the day, if, if you know, it could take one pilot to screw everything up. So if we’re not helping each other out in the, in the interim then we’re just not doing it, doing the service that we should be doing for our industry. So, you know, I, I kudos these guys for being such great representatives of their industry down where they’re at, but they’re part of a bigger picture too. And then the drone, I mean, the drones, I just sat there. It’s not going to stop. We got a lot, you know, there’s a lot of work coming for all of us. So it’s, it’s, it’s, it’s great. And it’s exciting.

Justin McAleece:

It’s good to hear that you guys have a good community going and you feel inclusive and all that stuff and trying to bring everyone up simultaneously that should be at that level. That’s great. We got, we’re running real close to five, so we’re going to do the giveaway real quick. So how we do this is in the chat. If you guys can each put in a number from one to, from a one to a hundred, basically, and then whoever gets closest wins the 50 bucks. So that’s what we’re going to do. So I’ll give you a 15 seconds, 20 seconds to put in your numbers. Everyone put them in, in the chat here. Yup. Yup. Yup. Cool. Two 77’s, man. I hope I don’t get 77. That’s going to mess everything up

Jamie Goodwick:

Justin, I appreciate you having us. This has been really informative for me and I hope it has been for whoever’s watching. It’s just, it’s cool. Just cool to see that everyone’s doing well, you know, miss everything right now. Yeah, absolutely.

Justin McAleece:

You guys are on a whole different level from what I operate on a drone wise. And it’s really interesting to hear. I mean, that’s big, important stuff with a lot of money up in the air with people who are really good at that stuff. So it’s pretty cool. All right. So it seems like we might be done clicking in. All right. I’m going to pull up my random number generator here. This is from a one to a hundred essentially. And what do we got 15? That’s a one five, which puts us closest to, I believe Kelsey one, one, five. That would be eight. Yeah. So Kelsey Ole Ollie, I think you are the winner of this week, so that’s pretty cool. That’s Kelsey with a 15. All right. So tell me you guys fill me in with what your, how to find you, you know, if they want to get ahold of you, if anyone else wants to talk to you because we had a lot of unanswered questions here cause we ran out of time because we had so much to talk about. So Jaron, how, how do they get ahold of you?

Jaron Denson:

What do you think would be the best way to do it? I’m not, you know, you know, one thing I’ve done is I’ve done a disservice to my company by not engaging in social media. I just, I can’t stand it, man. I just, I really can’t stand social media and it’s such a disservice to

Jaron Denson:

That would be dronetechaerial.com

Justin McAleece: And Chris?

Chris Schuster:
That’s a Tony question marketing. He’s a marketing captain.

Tony Carmean:

We have three different URLs, but it all feeds in the same website. It’s aerialmob.com or vortexaerial.com that all feeds into the same website.

Jamie Goodwick:
Pretty website, man. Pretty cool. I check that out there.

Chris Schuster:

Thank you. I appreciate it. Thanks. Thanks buddy.

Justin McAleece:
What about you, Jamie?

Jamie Goodwick:
Uh yeah. Portlandrone.com. It’s all one word one D in the middle of Portland, drone.com

Justin McAleece:
In the middle. Yep. Yep. Portlandrone.com. Good grant.

Grant Gulesserian: It’s flybyimagery.com.

Justin McAleece:

Okay. Very nice. I’m just putting these in the chat in case anyone wants to see it and Tony we, you already told us. Okay, well, that’s it. If anyone wants to hit you guys up in any of those ways they have that opportunity and this has been the shoot stop video real quick plug, just cause we didn’t really get a chance to do that. Anyone out there who does, who flies, drones, who has any, any job in the video production industry go to shoot stock, video, set up a profile. It’s how we, we personally as Blare Media and the other people we’d support. That’s how we hire people is we find people on Institute stop video, cause it’s our own little Rolodex and it’s a Rolodex for a lot of other video production companies out there. So go make a make a profile, get some reviews on there.

Justin McAleece:

I mean, that’s, what’s so great about it is you can actually get people hired because of good reviews. And these guys are, you know, obviously people that would get good reviews and that’s important within our industry. So that’s that we will congrats to Kelsey for winning and thank you guys so much for being on a wealth of knowledge here that I had no idea about some of it, which is really pretty astounding. So I appreciate everyone’s time and yeah, take care. Keep yourself safe in this crazy times we’re having right now the day after the election and yeah, have a good one.

 

Leave a Reply