Our 11th webcast where we discuss the topic of acting in movies vs commercial projects.

 

 

We explored the topic of acting in movies vs commercial projects and answer the questions of how to get paid acting gigs, how to secure an agent or be in a talent agency and what to expect in your career as an actor. We also focus on the demands and perks of the different types of projects actors typically do including narrative, commercial, corporate, etc.

 

Panelists:

Jennica Schwartzman
@JennicaRenee on IG
www.JENNICASCHWARTZMAN.com

Brandon Baker
@bbbrandonbaker on instagram

Magnus Chhan
@magnuschhan on IG/Twitter/FB

Mindy Montavon
IG/Twitter: @mmonty007
www.mindymontavon.com
www.IMDb.com
www.thebombshelterseries.com

Vinnie Horst
Instagram: @vincehorst
www.vinniehorst.com
YouTube Channel

Hester Schell
www.HesterSchellCreative.com

 

Jennica Schwartzman:

Well, hello and good afternoon. And welcome to crew talk webcast. I’m Jennica Schwartzman, and I’m very lucky to be joined by all of you here. It’s lovely to see your faces. Can I actually ask each of you to tell us your name and where you’re talking to us from? I assume it’s the same place where you work so we can get an idea of who you are. And then we’ll go through and ask you to tell us a little bit more about you, but let’s start with your name. So anybody at home can write down. So if they have any questions at the end, they can say, Hey, you know, Brandon really love to ask you this one question if they have specific. So what’s, what’s everybody’s name. Let’s start with Mindy.

Mindy Montavon:
I’m Mindy Montavon. I am based in Los Angeles.

Jennica Schwartzman:
Great. Thank you. And ms. Hester.

Hester Schell:

I’m Hester Schell. I was based in the Bay area and when I retired from my college academic life, I moved back to Portland, which is on fire today.

Jennica Schwartzman: And Magnus?

Magnus Chan:
I left for a quick second, but I’m returning. What was the question?

Jennica Schwartzman:
Just give us your name and where you’re talking to us.

Magnus Chan:
Alright. My name is Magnus Chan. I’m from Los Angeles out of Pasadena.

Jennica Schwartzman: Great. And Brandon?

Brandon Baker:
My name is Brandon Baker and I’m in Fresno, California, right.

Jennica Schwartzman:
And Vinnie last but not least.

Brandon Baker:
I am also in the orange County, Los Angeles area, originally hailing from Winnipeg, Canada.

Jennica Schwartzman:

So many questions that all of us are going to ask you. Now,

Brandon Baker:
No problem eh? Just go for it, eh?

Jennica Schwartzman:

That’s what I was going to ask actually. So we’re going to be talking about acting and movies versus commercial, but also just a lot of general questions and I’ve written down some and they’re all gotchas. So you should be very concerned about what we’re going to show your family. Love to have anybody chime in and tell us a little bit about the type of work that you do. How you got into that specific type of work. If you work more commercial or work more film, or honestly work more industrial or voiceover where you’re at right now, or in the last few years, since we don’t know where we’re at right now, and I’d love to know specifically what’s the last job that you, cause I think that’s fun.

Mindy Montavon:

I’ll Start. So I had planned on going to school at UCLA to study acting for film and TV. And instead ended up going to New York and training in musical theater because my thought was, well, if I can sing and dance, I can work more as an actress, just kind of opens things up. So I did theater for about a decade on the East coast where they paid you to do it. And then I moved down to LA, don’t really pay you to do it.

Mindy Montavon:

And so out here I focus more on film and TV and I tend to do commercials probably more than anything, commercials and industrials. I have never worked in an office, but I own a ton of suits simply for jobs. And yeah, I actually, I shot something earlier today. I don’t know, there’s a lot of stuff happening right now where they’re putting ads on like Instagram and tick talk Facebook stuff. And I think maybe it’s for something like that, but it’s it’s a new kid streaming app. So I filmed that earlier today. Yeah. Great. That’s amazing that you were oftentime to come on there. It was quick. I got to shoot it at home because we’re doing a lot of that with the pandemic, so yeah. Great. Well, that’s ASCA history. Let’s put you on the spot. I want to hear it.

Hester Schell:

Oh, on the spot. My favorite place. Well like Mindy, I started in New York, a New York city in theater, a little late in the last century. And I think our journey is a constantly evolving. So I was a performer for a long time, many decades. And then as I got older, there’s less work. I became a director and started directing not just theater but shorts and some other content and because of teaching acting for as long as I’ve taught acting I wrote a book on casting. And then I bought, no, I bought the business first in the Bay area. I ran Bay area casting news in the nineties when all of this access on the internet was just starting to build. And we were the first online audition sourced pretty much on the West coast. It was called Bay area casting news.

Hester Schell:

And when I retired from academia, I left the Bay area and came back to Portland. And since I’ve been back up here, I’ve been really busy. I’m writing. I just booked a lead in an ensemble feature, a psychological thriller that we’re going to shoot up here depending on budgets. And COVID, we might do it this fall, or we might wait until next spring with everything can just calm down a little bit. And then I booked a rewrite on a feature script. A big budget script is producer a very well known producer who lives down in Joshua tree, hired me to do this major rewrite. And it’s awesome. I’m having a great time with it. So I’ve been at it for a long time. I started out as an actor and now I’m writing. I will coach actors if they really want me to, but you know, you do something for that long I’ve taught acting for 40 years.

Hester Schell:
I’m really, really happy to be promoting my book. And I’m self identifying as a screenwriter.

Jennica Schwartzman:

Thank you for highlighting that Hester. That’s an important thing that I’m sure all of us can relate to is that at some point while acting, you recognize that you’re very valuable. You have a lot to bring to the table and you want to share it and the roles have gone down. You’re still booking, you’re still in demand, but the rules change as you change and the industry doesn’t change as well. But thank you. That’s, that’s amazing. We should definitely all get back on that later. Magnus, would you like to share a little bit more about your background?

Magnus Chan:

Yeah, sure. I was I grew up in Fresno went to Fresno city college for the state, did a lot of theater, did a let a comedy there. And then I moved to Los Angeles 2013. So I’ve been here since then doing a lot of comedy and improv more recently stand up. I work a lot, mostly commercially lately I’ve been trying to get into more and more theatrical rooms. The last thing I booked was CoStar on young, young Sheldon before everything shut down. Thanks. so yeah, just try to keep the momentum and keep working and getting better in different aspects.

Jennica Schwartzman:

Great. That’s wonderful. Congratulations. I’m sure we’re all very excited for you for that one. Brandon, Paul’s more about your background and the last job you booked.

Brandon Baker:

No, just kidding. Okay. Sorry to interrupt. Yeah, I, I, so I started writing, I I’ve always been a writer and I love, I love telling stories and me and my best friend in high school just started, we’d write together. And then in college we started making short films together and he didn’t want to have, and so we didn’t want to call people. And so I was in them. So we ended up making a ton of short films different. We just met a bunch of connections over the years and in different ways we got those films out there. And yeah, I kinda caught the bug. I had always been interested in acting, but I never thought I could do it. I had that kind of imposter syndrome, which is still have but I’m sure we’ll talk about that at some point, but, but yeah, I’ve been doing it for about 15 years now. Mainly commercials some short films just in a feature length for the first time, like last year. And so a lot of fun and yeah, it’s been a busy season. It was shut down for a while, so there was nothing happening. And now I just finished a short film. I’m doing another one next month and I have a sandwich commercial tomorrow. So keeping pretty busy.

Jennica Schwartzman:

Great. Thank you for saying that. And I’m sure we’re all kind of excited for you that you have something happening next month. That’s amazing.

Brandon Baker:

Yeah. After months and months of nothing it’s been, yeah, it’s been, it’s been cool.

Jennica Schwartzman:
And Vinnie, would you like to tell us more about your background?

Brandon Baker:

Yeah. Well, it seems that I am the baby of the group. I am I’ve actually only been acting for a few years, two years. I would, I shouldn’t even, shouldn’t lie two years. Yeah, so I’m, I’m new to this whole thing. And I am very excited to to, to be speaking with you guys. Cause I think I’m going to listen and learn a lot, but no. So my background is actually entirely the opposite of, of what you guys what everybody else is talking about with their educated backgrounds. Mine is a computer science degree. So yeah, I may I work in corporate America as a day job and I have fallen in completely in love with with the idea, not with the idea with actually acting. And so I’ve been taking courses through various schools mostly in the studios and and learning all the ropes that I can and, and the beta, a few small films some some, some shorts some industrials, a little bit on the commercial side, some print, some modeling just kind of feeling around and, and, and discovering what what suits me.

Brandon Baker:
Yeah. So thank you for having me today. I’m excited to be here.

Jennica Schwartzman:

Well, that’s actually a really great way to ask everybody to hop forward in the questions to say, what’s the primary way that you are able to pay your bills? I don’t know if the pandemic is going to be something you want to share much about how you’re paying your bills, if at all. But having a background like when somebody is a medical doctor or somebody was in the military and coming into Los Angeles, you just have so much more to offer. And like, it’s something that you can get into a writer’s room if you’re a lawyer and you can be a consultant and you can work on things and bring so much authenticity to a role because you’re seen as a real person with life experience in a specific area, and people want to like leech off of your real life. It’s so exciting.

Jennica Schwartzman:

So what are some of the jobs, if anybody wants to share something that has probably helped them be a better actor, but also helped pay the bills in a more stable way. I’ll go first. My husband pays for most of our lifestyle. I’m at home with the kids. And so we’re both able to be actors and he does handyman work. So it’s flexible that he can go to any audition he wants. I can do the same. The flexibility is amazing. Everybody knows that we’re actors and we live in Los Angeles and Hollywood. So there’s an expectation that most people are actors. So they’re going to abandon the job mid day for no reason, not tell you. But I have friends that have lots of different types of jobs in tech. So anybody else have a job like that? My main source of income right now is a script writing

Hester Schell:

Writing. I used to do a lot of voiceover. I got into sag and after up here in Portland, back in the eighties because there was a small group of, of really talented people that could bring the skill level up, you know, just raise it all up. So my bread and butter was, was voiceover and commercials. I did a lot of commercials up here when I was under 40. And as I got older, I made the decision to go and get an MFA so that I could continue to teach and get paid and do what I love and do productions. And so I became a professor of film and theater and was in California. So my, my once I kind of topped out in the casting ranges that I spent the next 20 years in academia, so that I would have a nest egg, I’d have a pension and I could keep doing the work he directing and producing and, and, and writing.

Hester Schell:

And then when I retired now, everything is wide open again. And the younger voters, please, we gotta do everything we can to hang on to social security. You’re going to need it. You’re going to need it. And it’s the lifeline for so many people. So make sure you understand what’s happening with our Congress with social security. I think it’s really important to bring up is that having a stable income as you’re aging, you’re still able to produce and work in the arts, but it’s not really going to have the stability as the support from the government that is set in stone. Hopefully. anybody else I know Magnus, you were trying to say

Magnus Chan:

Yeah, I’m pretty much your typical actor. I I serve and I bartend in the evenings which works great for, for where I’m at. Cause my wife, she has, she works a normal nine to five. She’s a director at a UCLA. And so it works out for taking care of our daughter. So she I’m at home during the day. And then, you know, she’s here during the evening. So it works out for us.

Brandon Baker:

I like Hester. I got my MFA also, and I’m now, I’m now teaching. I was in retail for a decade. I went to Fresno state in, for instance, they got my MFA there in 2013. And then now I’m teaching English at a bunch of different schools around here. And I could teach online right now, which is good and bad. I have kids and single dads, so it’s kinda rough, but yeah, I’m able to still act and, and have that freedom.

Hester Schell:

I loved teaching acting. I did it for 40 years, both in a vocational situation through like parks and rec and then academics institutions did a lot of guest speaking, a visiting professor kind of thing. Apart from my full time job. And then I developed a whole series of seminars called the director’s retreat where I would have maybe six film directors and 12 actors. And we would, we would go through scene study skills and how to, you know, how do you pull better performances out of your, your cast? So we did that for many years down in the Bay area, the directors retreat. And that was, it was just so much fun. So I’ve been in both academia, vocational professional teaching arenas.

Brandon Baker:
I said, Fresno needs, you don’t really have those here.

Hester Schell:

Well, I, I don’t know that I’m going to be able to come back to California. I’m, I’m freaking out about the fires. All right. That’s my, that’s my day. It’s like, I know this is like common for you guys, but it rains all the time up here. How can Oregon be on fire?

Brandon Baker:

Well, here at rains ash.

Jennica Schwartzman:

And Mindy, I wanted to ask everybody, if you can think of those places, what is one of the top two go to places for good paying, acting gigs that you go right now? What are the current online sources or in person sources? I don’t know.

Mindy Montavon:

Well, I mean, I would say there’s three main sites online that I use for work. Actors access LA casting, which is part of casting networks, which is more like the nationwide branch of it. And then backstage and backs, which is actually where I found most of my work throughout the pandemic. And I use backstage back before, like any of these platforms were online and it was just like a newspaper that came up Thursday that you’d pick up. Like next stage is old school and still going strong and tell us what’s a newspaper. I get like that junk on your hands. And you feel dirty and smudge is on your face. I needed one for a prop and I was like, I don’t know where to find them out here. Ralph’s grocery store does sell you need one and Magnus. Are you using the same sites or are there any other sites or resources?

Magnus Chan:

Yeah, those casting frontiers one that hasn’t been mentioned yet. I used those casting frontier and all these go through my agent. So if I see something, I didn’t want me to just forward it because they don’t like to be, have people with double submit. So I’m not allowed to submit myself. I, if I see something that I think I’m a good fit for, I just forwarded and make sure that I’ve been submitted for it.

Jennica Schwartzman:
Hey, interesting. Not and Vinnie, are you on all these sites?

Brandon Baker:

Yes. Yeah, actually all of them. And one of the things I wanted to point out to I find that that, that there’s different types of

Brandon Baker:

Work on like focused on LA casting. For example, it was much more commercial work than it would be theatrical work. Whereas backstage, for me, at least maybe in my, in my wheelhouse, me and my, the, the age that I play in and so on, it’s much more theatrical than it is commercial. So is that, is that something that you guys all see as well

Jennica Schwartzman:

On actors access for people who are watching, if you’re unfamiliar with theatrical is referring to TV and film, usually in Los Angeles, even though it also encompasses theater for most of the country in the world. But yes, actors access has more TV and film opportunities, episodics and features and short films and LA casting has more commercial opportunities. That’s where commercial casting directors put their focus. Casting frontier has a good amount of both because it’s also really powerful in different regional parts of the country. And what were some of the other ones that backstage a lot of, I’d say a large amount of opportunities in everywhere, but especially like theater, you don’t really find as many other places. Yeah. That’s basically the main place I find any sort of theater would be backstage. Does anybody have any other like for instance, here’s a tip for actors access when you’re submitting to things, if you don’t have a slate shot, which when you upload a headshot and you upload your real, you need to have both on there in order to submit some places because a casting director can click a little box and hide all submissions that don’t have a head shot and a real, they can also hide submissions that don’t have a slate shot, which is like a five second shot during your headshot session where people are taking your photos and you just take a video for five seconds.

Jennica Schwartzman:

Hi, I’m Jennica Schwartzman, and I’m a cheerleader or whatever it is that you would say. Cause that’s definitely not what I would say. And that a slate shot, you upload along with your headshot so that the casting director can’t click a little box and make you disappear with all those submissions that they just want to take those 10,000 down to 1000. You don’t want to be thrown out with the 9,000. So are there any other tips or any other tricks that you found with LA casting or casting frontier or any of the online sites that you want to share or favorites? Yes. Hester

Hester Schell:

I know it’s expensive, but I have found it worth every penny. I am DB pro. I am DB pro has a casting button.

Brandon Baker: For finding work?

Hester Schell:

Yes, yes I am. And the nice thing about that is that you can, it’s all cross reference so you can see who the production company is. You can see what their track record is. You can see who they hired before. You can see what other casting directors they’ve worked with. You can research, Oh, the casting that booked me on that is now working over there. And I want to be on that show. That’s, that’s my kind of show. That’s my kind of the type that’s my work. So I call it a reverse reverse search start with what shows is it logical that you are type that they need, we’re all filling needs here. And find out as much as she can about about everybody working on that show is just, you know, it’s about building relationships, always about building relationships. And I will probably get to that how people are increasing their their Facebook hits and their Twitter feeds and having it between between two actors, if one has a huge base and following and one doesn’t, they’re going to cast the one that has a bigger following, especially in LA and New York.

Hester Schell:

That’s not so much the case in the regional markets, but I’m probably getting off topic from the question a little bit, but anyway, reverse search. I am DB pro. And seeing if where you have common connections, cause that’s one of the features on IMDB pro you’re related to 2020 people is producer. I’m working for right now in this rewrite checked out all his stuff on IMDV three pro we have 200 people in common from all the projects that we’ve worked on. So things that things like, things like that, that can, can build your interconnectedness and build relationships is going to lead to more work.

Jennica Schwartzman:

I completely agree. I found nothing but that to be the truth is relationships actually are King here. I don’t know what are other areas areas where you focus your energy and your attention when you want to collect those people. When you collect agents, when you want to get the attention of a manager or of a casting director especially if you’re targeted what do you think is your best tool in connecting with agencies or people who will help you on the path?

Hester Schell: Kindness.

Jennica Schwartzman:

Yes, yes. And Hester, I love that you shared that being present on social media does help. It doesn’t help anybody. It doesn’t help every type, but it is a big determining factor between,

Hester Schell:

Well that are the same casting age range and type. You have to let go of thinking of them as thinking of them as your competition. They’re your colleagues, they’re your network. They’re the people that can help you. You might have a doppelganger and you see them in every audition you go to that doesn’t make them your enemy or your, you know, somebody that you have to beat or compete against because it’s ultimately not your decision is It’s out of your control. So please be nice because.

Jennica Schwartzman:

I agree. I think that’s a huge one because that’s what you’re known for and why else are you doing whatever it is you’re doing? Does anybody else have something that really jumps out as something that really helped me connect with a great agent or really helped put me in the right area to meet somebody who would be a good partner?

Jennica Schwartzman:

I would probably offer that I’m working on my reels and updating reels and putting them out there has been probably one of my number one marketing tools I can take pretty headshots all day long. But I feel like when I’ve posted a reel or shared a reel or reached out to a casting director with something that was cast in, or let’s be honest, I created myself because content creation is a part of the duel now. And then I put it out there. The actual short one minute video has really been one of my favorite tools to connect with people who can see exactly what it has to was saying. Like, this is the type, this is the person, this is what they represent. It’s definitely more communicative than a photo now. And hearing somebody’s voice, I think is really important now. Where have you guys found agents or managers or partners what types of forums or places or connected sites?

Vinnie Horst:

So along the same lines Jennica focusing my attention lately, given that I’m new to the industry and still finding my sea legs. One of the things that I have been focusing on is actually a YouTube channel and building that and giving and giving myself an opportunity to create my own content to, for people to hear my voice, as you said, and see my face. And for also to, for me to practice my craft, because there’s a certain way that, that you need to behave on camera and there’s skills involved there and so on. And so that’s, that’s been my focus and it has been fruitful to a degree. Certainly I, I have agents, no, but I’ve had people reach out to me saying, Hey, love the channel. And we’d like to interview or would like to have a chat or let’s get together for coffee. I mean, these days it’s more of a zoom conversation, but but just getting my name out through through creating content of my own YouTube has been has been helpful for me.

Jennica Schwartzman:

I agree. That’s been my experience as well. I’m glad that you’re creating content and you’re able to speak your own voice and you’re able to create a role around you. That’s so valuable. Mindy, what has it been like with your agent and your manager? What is something that you’d want to tell somebody before they have their first agent or manager about the relationship or what that’s going to look like? I think a big part of it is making sure you’re on the same page. I had met with one I’ve been in LA for about 12 years now. And

Mindy Montavon:

I met with one a couple of times. Like I went in and then a couple of years later went in. He definitely did not remember me. And it was kind of like, alright, so I want you to get this picture, this picture, this picture. And I had pictures and he didn’t even want to see them, you know, he’s like, Oh, I see this. I was like, well, why don’t you take it? You know? And it was just kinda like, I felt like just a number as opposed to like, let me, let me tell you, like, these are the kinds of things that I do. This is, this is my strong suit. And for me, when I can talk to agents and they, I know that they’re going to be pitching that’s massive because if you don’t have anybody who’s gonna pitch for you, then you might as well just be submitting yourself. Because that’s, what need is that little extra oomph from your agent or your manager, you know.

Mindy Montavon:

Entails and what that’s like and what that means for most people. Yeah. So it, it’s, it’s kind of like, well, it’s a relationship business, so it’s easier for agents to, if they, if they’ve been in the business for, you know, 20, 30 years. And so they have certain relationships, you know, a lot of casting directors have their like little group of agents that they tend to work with. The manager that I’m with, there are certain like casting directors who will specifically go to her and kind of say to you, I don’t really want to put this out on all the casting sites and deal with the headache. Do you have anybody on your list? You know? And so they can say, Oh yeah, you know, you’re looking for somebody who does commute, a fork who has a background in improv, you know, they know your specific skills.

Mindy Montavon:

You know, like I’ve got a background in musical theater. I have a musical theater demo reel, and I would have, I had an agent for a while. Who’d be like, do you sing? Like I, yes. And I have like, are you not even looking at my site? So it was just kind of making sure that, that your agents take the time to learn who you are and what you can do, because if they don’t, I mean, the only thing harder than finding an agent is finding a good one. It’s just so important to ask certain questions and make sure they’re willing to go to bat for you because you need somebody to give you that extra push, because there’s just so many people in the business that without it, you get lost.

Jennica Schwartzman:
Yeah. Has anybody had the best relationship with their agent before?

Hester Schell:

I had a really good agent when I was in salt Lake city while I was in graduate school, Susie McCart, McCartney, or McCarthy, Susie McCarthy, and in salt Lake city, because I booked, she made money. I made money. I finally got, I finally got sag healthcare. It was we just had good communication. She didn’t have a lot of really well trained people that could do print voiceover commercials features. I just, you know, there’s no substitute for being ready and, and knowing that your skillset, your tools are sharp. And we could wax poetic about all the different tools that are in the actor’s box. But jumping back to the previous question, one thing that didn’t come up with that would be, if you’re not a union actor to still go after the franchised agents, and that list is available to you on the side website, stick to the franchise agents, they’ve been tested, tried and true, and they know the rules. And they’d take a lot of nonunion people and get them going. So an agent that won’t even look at your pictures wants you to go spend money on their photographer. That’s right. Dumps down there. They’ve got some kind of financial incentive to work with a photographer, and they’re all just, you know, shoot more pictures, make money. You just hit the door. Don’t even, don’t even call them back. But the franchise agents cannot do that kind of thing. So even if you’re not in the union, it’s a pretty extensive list. It’s not,

Jennica Schwartzman:

I mean, it’s, it’s nationwide, literally go and look up the state that you’re in and see everybody who’s listed. So it’s, if you’re not in a big city, it’s a great opportunity to find your way in. And does anybody have any tips to share on what to avoid when you do that? Like any way to tell who is a predatory agent who’s taking advantage versus somebody who’s really genuinely interested in seeing you

Hester Schell:

Yeah. To try to sell you a package of classes and that they try to sell you a particular photographer for her. Those are warning signs.

Brandon Baker:

Yeah. That’s the, one of the things that you know, being new to the industry that I was taught right from day one is that if somebody is asking you to pay to participate, not, it’s not cool. You shouldn’t participate, you shouldn’t pay for auditions. You shouldn’t pay to, to be represented. The reason why when you pay the, your representative, your agent or your manager, that’s going to be when you book or when they book you work, then they get paid. You don’t pay them ahead of time. Right? So one of the things that I love to share with, with people who are even newer than me in this industry is that I suppose it’s, it’s in my own head. When I first started this thing, I thought, wow, this this world, it must be different. It must be different from real life. No, it’s exactly the

Brandon Baker:

Same as real life. This, this acting thing, this this whole entertainment industry, follow your gut, just like you would, if, if somebody you meet in the street, if you don’t have the right vibe, when you walk away, you shouldn’t do the same thing here. It’s real life. It’s no different.

Jennica Schwartzman:

And I really want to touch on what Mindy brought up is that agents, you know, you can tell the good ones from the bad ones, the good ones have good relationships. When you’re booking and you’re seeing some of the same people and they’re going out to the same people, it’s because they’ve been here for 12 years, they’ve been here for 50 years. They know people. So when a casting director has this group of agents that they see it’s because, well, we all used to be interns together. We all used to be assistants together. We all went to USC together, you know, 25 years ago, but nobody knows that we used to party together. You know, there’s lots of reasons. But that’s really good when somebody has a lot of connections and they’ve been here for a long time, it’s very valuable. And you want to be a part of a relationship like that.

Jennica Schwartzman:

You want to not just be a part of it to take advantage, but you want to be in a group that can last, that has never tip business really more than a, you know, that’s kind of what I learned. It’s like, number one, what do you look like? Are you fitting like the specs? You know, who do you know that I’ll even like, get you in there to begin with? And then it’s like talent, like sure. Yes, talent is important. But I feel like sometimes the other things trumpet, because it just, it gives you that edge to, you know, why do people know? You know, it’s like nepotism is a thing. Unfortunately, it just is, you know, but I think it’s like that, you know, and every business. So, and let’s jump forward to a question I had sent to you guys about what do you do to get rehired since it is a relationship business and a Hester? I agree. Kindness is super important. The day you arrive on set, what do you make sure to do that day to get invited back to that set?

Brandon Baker:

No, your lines stay, stay positive. So I’m in Fresno. I don’t have an agent. I don’t have any of this stuff. That’s why I’ve been silent. But it is about relationships. It’s about being nice being willing to play, you know, being, being available, doing what the director asks you to do, having a good attitude. Those simple things are really what continued to get me work

New Speaker:

and over again. And I know I’m not always the first choice even around here. So, but I’ll get calls cause people know I’m, I’m ready and willing and I’ll have a positive attitude. And I’ll, I’ll add to, I’ll add something to the production that not everyone does, you know, some people are super negative or some get, you know, super in their own heads about it and intent, you know, for different reasons. But, but yeah, it really is about making those connections and, and that

Jennica Schwartzman:

For an acting gig on set, I make sure I know who the PA’s are. They’re going to be your lifeline. God bless the PAs. I learned names. I used to shake hands a lot, but we don’t do that anymore. I think if you genuinely care about people, cause you don’t know that PA might be hiring you in five years and they’re directing a feature. You don’t know you and, and you, you can’t make judgements. Someone who you might think is an idiot, might be the sharpest tack in the box. We all have to work against that. The stereotype of, of the hard to get along with fussy actor, that’s over demanding, whatever you get for a dressing room is whatever you got, whatever this production company could afford. So check your complaints, curb, don’t bring ’em on set. That’s this is, this is the budget. This is your trailer. This is what we’re dealing with. You know, we’re not on a back lot and we’re not in the studio deal with it. So be flexible and roll with the punches.

Magnus Chan:

Yeah. I would say just kindness and it looked like everyone else was saying it, cause it really is all about relationships and networking. Cause a lot of the networking I’ve done like 10 years ago or just be maintained, relationships and friendships have helped me like recently. And you just never know when those relationships are gonna come back around to help you or you can help another person. So just being nice, everybody from that on the set, no matter what level they are, cause you really never know when it’s going to come around and be able to help you or help them. So

Hester Schell:

For the newbies there’s a reason why we talk about sports. When we’re hanging around at craft services or having a meal, you don’t talk about your personal life. You don’t talk about sex and you don’t talk about politics. Just those are the rules you stay away from from those topics. Yeah, baseball’s, baseball’s wonderful. I miss it. And there’s other things that you don’t know sports. You can talk about, you know, grocery prices.

Brandon Baker:
I don’t know. There’s a lot of like whatever snacks there at the craft station, you know? Yeah.

Hester Schell:

Here’s a survival tip walk away from, complainer’s just walk away. Don’t stand there because somebody is going to see you standing there and hear that there’s a group of people complaining about something in there and you’re standing there. Maybe you didn’t complain, just walk away. People like, excuse me, you got to go take care of something.

Brandon Baker:
That’s a good way to get out of it.

Hester Schell:
The problem don’t, you know, sounds cliche, not part of the solution. You’re the problem.

Jennica Schwartzman:

Hm. I met Magnus actually in 2012 on a set. He was there for, I saw you many days generously doing a very small role in a movie and I was helping, I was an actor on it, but I was also,

Magnus Chan:
She was great by the way, super good. Super funny.

Jennica Schwartzman:

No one knows yet that maybe hasn’t come out. When you’re on set and it’s your first day on set and you have a speaking role, cause that’s a little different than just doing general background. You have a speaking role and your first dance that since Magnus, I know that you’ve had a really great attitude and gave it your all. What’s a piece of advice for somebody who’s first time walking on a speaking real set.

Brandon Baker:

I would, I try to maintain the same attitude as when I don’t have a speaking role, just be kind to everybody speaking role or not show up, be prepared on time, ready to, to, you know, do the work and to be available too. Cause I know a lot of people, there’s a lot of downtime when you’re on sets and they’re, they’re all goofing around or have headphones in and you know, and people are looking for them and they don’t know where they are and that’s huge stress. So the more available you can be and ready to go and with just a, a good, strong, friendly, positive attitude, it really does go a long way.

Mindy Montavon:

That’s great advice. I think I was just going to say, like, I think something that often gets lost is the fact that it’s an ensemble and everybody’s working together, you know, and, and if it’s, unless it’s like, like, let’s say it’s a film. If it’s not, if it’s like an indie feature and you don’t have like stars, so there hasn’t, there’s nobody like who’s been attached from it from the ghetto. Oftentimes the actor is the last piece of the puzzle to kind of get added in, you know, especially for like smaller roles, you know? It’s, it’s like you’re added and you’re, you’re there to do a job. All these other people are there to do their job and it’s like, you’re all working together. And I think that oftentimes there can be like, like ego that gets in the way. I mean, it doesn’t necessarily just have to be actors like can be like egotistical, you know, people behind the scenes too.

Mindy Montavon:

But I think just remembering that you’re all in it together and everybody’s got a role to play to make things work, I think helps kind of calm the nerves if you’re nervous. And just maybe like, you know, make you just grateful for getting to be a part of it. I agree. When Brandon, I wanted to ask you when people walk onto one of the sets that you guys have been making, because you guys have worked together a lot over the years. I like to, when I book a role, bring 10 Starbucks gift cards for $10 each. And when I meet somebody in wardrobe, I go and I go Caroline. And then when I’m saying goodbye at the end of the day, I say, thank you. And I say, Caroline, you were so helpful. I really loved how you worked with

Jennica Schwartzman:

Me in wardrobe. This is, you know, here’s a Starbucks gift card and I do that, but I only have like 10 because if it takes away a good chunk of the cost of me being there, the investment is that I think in coming back, what are some things great idea. I love that. I’m just going to say thank you cards to the casting director, where, whether you got the job or not, we usually picture postcards as a follow up. Remember those? Does anybody do those anymore exists, but send back Brandon, what can somebody do on one of your sets to make sure that, you know, we want that person back

Brandon Baker:
If I’m, so if I’m like producing or yeah.

Brandon Baker:

They are people who have good reputations. First of all, I’ll look for people who who are connected with someone. I know maybe, but even if not, maybe I’ve seen them in something. And they usually, I mean, around here, we all kind of know each other, so it’s kind of cheating. But they usually, they already have good reputations. But for them to stand out, yeah. Just, they wouldn’t need to give me, buy me any cards, although I might start requiring that. But they would just, just having a positive attitude. Yeah. Not being super negative if they’re super nervous or something just that they’re able to handle that and be able to verbalize it. Cause that’s fine. Cause people get like that all the time. That’s normal. But, but just that they’re, they’re a team player. I think you’ve all kind of said it. I don’t know if I can add much to that. I know when I’m doing a role,

Hester Schell:

You know, Brandon, the person that’s negative and complaining that’s, that’s what you remember not to bring them back. Yeah.

Brandon Baker:

I think people are smart in that at least in this small community to not do too much of that because they, it gets, it gets out really quick. I know for me though, when I get in my own head, when I’m acting on set I just remind myself, just have fun. Like that’s we get to play like, this is, this is a gift, you know? And so I think I look for that in other people too, when they, when they have that same mentality, that’s right.

Jennica Schwartzman:

We’ve covered some of like onset culture a little bit about what you bring to the table. And I want to know from you guys and your individual opinions, when you’re watching something you’re watching TV or film or commercial or any type of thing, or maybe like you’re having, watching like a sexual harassment video training video at work, what do you, what actor do you remember watching? And then looking them up. I mean like, Oh my gosh, Matthew, good is this guy is so hot in this movie, but maybe not so hot. Let’s let’s stick to, it is such a good actor. Oh my gosh, their name is Matthew. Good. And I’ll be following this person forever. What is somebody like that, that you’ve watched Vinnie? Do you have somebody like that?

Vinnie Horst:

The, I haven’t looked anybody up, but I want to address the first part of the question, which was, are there any actors that I have watched and what have I observed about them? And for me, that actor that I always go back to, and this is going way back is Peter Falk. If you remember, he was the Lieutenant Colombo in from 1968 to 2003. I always remember that.

Vinnie Horst:

Peter Falk. You’ll recognize it. But just when, when I watch him one of the things is when I’m starting out acting, is that yeah, you just do too much. Right. You’re just trying to overdo it. And with the facial expressions or with the hand movements or that’s Peter Falk and and, and he doesn’t do any of that. He just, he just, he lives in the moment and he he just is, and it’s just, it’s it’s, it was such a, an interesting thing to see and to realize what was happening. I mean, that was the key for me is to realize that he’s not doing anything he’s just living and being, and, and being an actor on a, on a set. And that was really interesting. So Peter Falk is my guy, for sure. I love him.

Jennica Schwartzman:

I would say that I think of the same thing as Christoph waltz. I just feel like he’s just being, we’re accidentally getting this. Yes. Does anybody else have an actor that like really jumps out at them or they were.

Hester Schell:

Yeah one of the newest members of Saturday night live, Chloe Fineman I’ll show the, the audience got a lot of she does impersonations and I cast her in a pilot that I did in California probably six years ago. And she’d just gotten out of Tisch school of the arts and yeah. Yeah. So I’ve worked with her now. She’s on SNL. It’s just amazing. And then, then COVID hit. So I hope they can get back to work soon.

Jennica Schwartzman:

She’s having a heyday though. Like what she brought to SNL, the internet version, she jumped right into a star position.

Hester Schell:

Yeah. But she had done she’s on YouTube and you got to watch her do her impersonation of Melania Trump. It’s hilarious. Absolutely hilarious. Whether spoon in a spot on drew Barrymore, you wouldn’t even know it. Oh, I’ve seen the drew Barrymore. I’m Timothy [inaudible]. Yeah. Check her out. I want her in my movie. I wonder in all of my movies have an actor that you’re watching, or I know a lot of people said this. Sean Colin Young, S H a w N. Shawn calling young did heart baby independent feature, incredible performance. He’s somebody to keep an eye on if you’re watching. Hello, I’m Sean. And I found him cause he, he gave me permission to put him to put in put his headshot in my book. So here he is Sean Colin.

Jennica Schwartzman: Oh yeah.

Hester Schell:

So there’s my book. Talk about that later. It says for film directors, but actors are getting a lot out of it. Wait what’s what’s on the other side of the table.

Jennica Schwartzman:
You got to know both sides. Yes. Yeah.

Hester Schell:

Yup. I’ll just, I’ll just hold it up here. You can get it on Amazon or Barnes and noble and all outlets. Second edition. It’s a good book.

Jennica Schwartzman:

When you are watching things have you completely changed or changed your mind about an aspect of the film industry watching it now, since you’ve been acting? Oh boy. Yeah.

Hester Schell:

I started in the seventies and we had to wait on the street corner in New York for the Wednesday or what was it? Monday, Thursday afternoon for backstage to come out. You guys have, you have the whole world at your fingertips. It’s amazing. The resources it’s all right there. The technology, you know, we didn’t have video cameras. We didn’t have cell phones.

Jennica Schwartzman:

Yeah. The, the ableism really shows that people who could stand, especially in New York, on the street for hours and hours and hours at a time completely like made up and ready to go is a very different world. Nobody here in LA understands what the, the world of New York was. And nobody understands that here. We’re a joke to people who are like classic new Yorkers because we’ve done. So a lot of what you look like. But we also have a completely different culture of casting. I know Fresno would have a completely different culture of casting. I want to hear a little bit about, does anybody have something about their casting experience that feels like it’s different from other places or they’ve been told is unique. For instance, I grew up in the heyday of casting director workshops in Los Angeles. They were something you had to be doing.

Jennica Schwartzman:

You had to be doing often. And if you weren’t doing them, you were judged that like, well, you’re just not investing in yourself. Even if a casting director said, definitely don’t do that. You still were judged because where are you going to send those postcards? Every time you get new headshots, what are you going to do every time you change your look, how are you going to get seen? It was a place to be seen again. And then casting director workshops. They became big after the writer’s strike. And then a few years later there was an incident with predatory practices and they disappeared and now you’re judged for doing them. So I feel like there was a really specific LA culture of casting director workshops that when I had friends visit from Northern California or people from New York, it just didn’t exist like that. That was, it would never happen. It was very weird. I went and visited new and

Jennica Schwartzman:

I wanted to get a New Mexico agent back when that was popular. And when I was there, I was like, how do I go to casting director workshops? And they were like, go away. That’s dumb. Anybody have any experiences like that were so different? I know history. I’m sure you have stories, but Brandon and Vinny, you’ve done the switch from Fresno to here. You would have a different idea of what it’s like.

Hester Schell:

The question being a person of color in a regional city, for example, if you’re, if you’re a good actor and you have any kind of color ethnicity, anything besides Whitey, you’re going to do really well up here. Cause there’s less trained, ready, available, people of color that are on set. Ready? Does that make sense?

Mindy Montavon:

Well, I think right now, anything other than whitey probably going to be good in any market. Quite honestly, it’s kind of it’s it’s in Vogue right now. Yeah.

Jennica Schwartzman:

The internet made it easier to access all different types of people, people who are able to click a box and say, I am an amputee, I am real. Or I’m willing to admit I’m trans. I am real. It makes it easier to click boxes and find people a little bit easier to say, I need specifically somebody who’s from this area of the Philippines who speaks with this dialect. Like you can find now, which before you had to rely on casting directors and agents to have been as inclusive to have them on their roster or know somebody who knew somebody who did a play once it’s, it’s definitely easier. Yeah. And, and I think just generally speaking you know, throughout the past few years doing self-tapes, you know, w where you, you audition on like tape tape please digitally record yourself and you send them.

Mindy Montavon:

And now, especially because of the pandemic and everything being shut down more and more offices are turning to doing these online self submissions. And so it provides opportunity for people across the country. So you don’t have to necessarily be in the big cities to get these things. You know, sometimes if it’s a smaller role, they’re going to try and cast it locally. I see things all the time, you know, must live in Austin, Texas, you know, must live in new Orleans, wherever, what have you. But typically speaking, it’s, it’s a really good time. And the industry keeps shifting more and more to this online presence so that you can do these submissions regardless of where you live, which is kind of, I think

Jennica Schwartzman:

I agree. And now that we’re in our last bit, I want to ask anybody watching, if you have questions general questions for the whole group or questions for individually, like Vinnie Magnus. I need to know this Hester, please tell me, like, please start typing that now so I can keep an eye on it. And I’ll be sure to ask before we’re done, but I would actually love to transition to what you’re bringing up. And the global pandemic has decimated what we were all working in as a modern film industry. And I feel like there’s trends that are already starting to change things. There are decisions that are made in development that are going to change about a year or two for now. We’re all going to feel when it comes to getting on those sets and the way those are distributed and consumed as an audience.

Jennica Schwartzman:

Every part of the pipeline has changed at least a little bit. Does anybody have a, a good idea of something that they’d want to share with somebody else that I’m seeing this trend Vinnie, since you’re like suit, like you’re a little bit newer to some of those processes. I bet it’s been confusing to have something’s changed like before we used to do like headshots a certain way, and then we slowly got more headshot with digital age, and then I feel like we’re going to, we’re in a trend of, wait, what is this full human look like again? So what have you seen since you’ve been here?

Vinnie Horst:

Well, with respect to things like headshots and media, I think the confusion, I think it’s a great word for, for somebody who’s just starting out is, is, is what is correct? Right. I don’t have an agent. I don’t have a manager who’s willing to, or who can inform me, tell me what is, you know, this is the direction you should go. So it’s a matter of figuring it all out on my own. And then when these things change, especially in the, in the, in the, in the world of that we live in COVID yeah. A little bit lost, but but that’s okay. At least for me, it’s a, it’s a, it’s a great opportunity to learn and to reinvest in, to use one of my corporate words to reinvest in, in my career and figuring it out and just enjoying the process because it’s going to take some time and that’s okay.

Jennica Schwartzman:

I don’t think anybody knows what’s right yet. In my experience, I’ve met casting directors who have leaned in to doing Instagram lives. Has anybody raise your hand? If you’ve participated Instagram lives by casting directors, see, you might not even know it’s happening. Tell me what it is. Individual offices are going on Instagram. It’s an app, and they’re doing live videos that they’re telling you, like at four o’clock on Wednesday, September 9th, we’re going to talk about self-tapes what we’re seeing in trends and what we want you to know about it. Or our office is going to change the way we’re doing this type of thing. So we’re going to talk about our office specific information. And so of these casting directors are doing outreach or one person from their office who knows how to use the computer is doing the outreach. And then you’re watching all these things and realizing that there is no consensus, any, like everybody has a different style.

Jennica Schwartzman:

We had today, an actor, a friend of mine, and in my network who wanted to know on his zoom audition, if he should, he doesn’t like the quality on his computer versus his phone. And a girlfriend was saying, well, the phone zoom app lighting is really bad. You definitely need to use a computer. And someone was saying, the sound doesn’t work on the phone. Well, you should definitely use the computer. And mine have all been computer, but these are all conflicting. Cause then you have any like trends or things that they know has changed or will be changing for you personally. You just came in.

Hester Schell:

Well, the video submission, we’re not, we’re not doing in person reads. We haven’t been doing that for long before. COVID I, I cast a feature in the Bay area that was entirely video submissions. Before we, if we’re bringing you in it’s callback, if you’re actually meeting the casting director, it’s a callback. They re they’ve, you know, they filtered you into the yes. Pile through whatever marketing materials you have out there already. So video submissions is I think now the standard, I don’t think we’ll ever do, you know, your first, your first look, your first time meeting a new casting director, first round, it’s all going to be. And this mentality I tell my clients is if you’re in the office, it’s a callback.

Vinnie Horst:

And some of the stuff on my level again, being the beginner I see a lot, a lot of opportunity for me to work with in the academia, with, with the directors that are working at USC, at UCLA, at NIFA NYU, the schools, the film schools, where they’re, where they’re teaching their students. They’re looking for actors constantly. I see on on the casting websites, I can submit myself or just to participate in a class through zoom.

Jennica Schwartzman:

Yeah. It’s going to be the new world. And I know with people like Brandon, I know you said that you’re a parent Magnus, you’re a parent, I’m a parent like knowing exactly what you just said has stirred that if you’re in the room, it’s a callback is nice for parents. I don’t have to pay for a babysitter. And even though my kids are in every single one of my auditions, now it’s not really against my tie. It might work against you Magnus with your look really young. Sometimes it’s fine. And people understand a casting director. I was just auditioning with their child. I could hear them in the background. So it does level the playing field for parents, people with lifestyle obligations, there’s tons of stuff. We only just have a hello from Matthew Pelino hello, back. And I would love to hear from each and every one of you, we can go through the same order with Mindy Hester, Magnus, Brandon Vinny, about what you want to plug that you’re working on and what you want us to know about you as we close out our wonderful panel. Thank you all for being here.

Mindy Montavon:

Yeah, well I do. So I see two questions in the Q and a box. I don’t, one’s got my name so I can answer Joel’s question. Great. Well, I’ll start with that. So the process yeah basically my like the, the last big thing I did before shut down was it’s for season two, a for all mankind, which has it come out yet? Yeah, it’s good. It’s so good. I can’t wait. I hope it’s coming back. I’m coming back. You know, as everything we just wait and see what happens. So my audition, it was, I got the, it was from my agent. I got the notification the day before, and so the next day I went to the studio and it was just a little casting office.

Mindy Montavon:

And, and it was interesting because it was, it was a love scene essentially, and not a whole lot of lines to it. And there was a chair set up and basically casting was like, we don’t want to see a slate. There’s a chair go. So I was like, okay. So essentially it was almost like improvisational. And then I just kinda did it. I left and I was like, Oh my God, I feel like such an idiot. And I, you know, I was like, this, I am. So, you know, then you run it in your head and you’re like, Oh, I could have done this. Like, Oh God, what, when I got a call from my agent within an hour saying that I was pinned for the project and I ended up booking it, but literally I was, you know, I had to wait for like the official booking, but essentially I was booked for it.

Mindy Montavon:

You know, and had like the pending offer within an hour a day, like 24 hours of getting the audition. So a lot of TV stuff like that happens really, really fast. So it’s tough because you really have to have the flexibility to be like, Oh, okay. And I’ve had so many auditions where it’s like, can you be here in two hours? And you’re like, hopefully, hopefully, you know that whatever, if you’ve got a survival job that it doesn’t kind of get in the way. So yeah, that was my, that was my experience. How can we watch a four Allman con it’s Apple TV plus? Yeah. So the first, the first season is out the morning show, that’s where you, you watch the morning show as well. And that was like the main, what is, yeah. So good. And that was the main show that was kind of plugged for the first season of a Apple TV. But yeah, if yeah, I’m trying to think, I don’t know if they have any deals when you know, all like the streaming services. It’s an OU, if you’re with me, you can get a free trial of this. So I don’t, I don’t know if they have any deals running

Brandon Baker:
That one’s, that one’s pretty cheap, I think. And it’s worth it.

Jennica Schwartzman:

Yeah. It’s not bad. Yeah, not bad at all. Yeah. See is amazing for all. Mankind is amazing morning shows, amazing every show we’ve committed to watching slowly throughout the pandemic. And they’re, they’re heavy hitters. They’re obviously going after HBO prestige and they are nailing it. Yeah. So good.

Brandon Baker:
Mystic Quests is really good.

Mindy Montavon:

I’m getting it. Okay. do you have anything to plug in indeed before we go into history have anything to plug? I don’t, I mean, I don’t, I don’t think so. I, you know, I had a production company and, you know, we had done a web series and we did like, you know, a short and that’s all out there, but that’s like, I feel like that’s in the past now we’re moving on to the future. So who knows? What’s in store, that’s all I’ll say. That’s true. Would you like to give us a little plug about your book? That could be the official line of it?

Hester Schell:

Yeah, but before I do the previous question about what else we’re doing. Yeah. Chief working in the writing world, what’s getting green-lit lately, what they’re looking for, or like one location, small casts, low budget. So as an actor, develop relationships with directors, find a script, create your own project, the idea of being self-directed and I don’t mean drag herself on set. I mean self determination. What I’m doing next is up to me, not waiting for somebody else to give me permission to do it. So develop relationships with writers and directors, put your own chain together, go hit, go hit those festivals. You know, there’s no such thing as an out of work actor, there’s always something that you could be working on. So self determination I was a classroom director in the Bay area for 20 years.

Hester Schell:

And so I would frequently get phone calls from directing students needing actors and the level of, of innocence naivete was huge. So the kinds of questions I would answer, I went, gosh, if this guy needs just that simple, basic information, then there’s a lot of people who do so casting revealed a guide for film directors. The first edition was published by Michael Weezy. Mike, always he books, like what was he productions? Save the cat, all, they’re all some of the great catalog of great film books. You want to be familiar with the titles. And it was the only book of its kind that’s an a to Z industry standard procedures for the director’s point of view. And then after started buying it, Oh, they want to know what’s going on behind the scenes. So that was the first edition in the second edition.

Hester Schell:

As soon as it came out, the first one I realized, Oh my gosh, I left this out. I left that out. So the second edition came out in 2017 with a new publisher I’m with Rutledge press now. And it’s now in several university reading lists and whatnot. So it’s a practical manual of standards, guidelines, how to get it done, how, how to run the room as a director, how to get better performances out of the actors. So there’s a really great chapter on just the basics of what it means to be a great actor. And the Vinny hit early on in this conversation today. It’s, it’s about being real and being in the moment, it’s not about playing some made up character, especially in film and television and especially in commercials, you’re working from yourself most of the time. So it’s all available in a lot of all your regular outlets.

Magnus Chan:

I don’t have anything that I know of that’s on the horizon. But I can plug my social media is I’m on Twitter and Instagram at my name Magnus Chan. And I usually post all my projects and shows. And if I have any standup shows or improv shows coming up, I usually post those mediums that when they’re coming out.

Jennica Schwartzman:

Great, thank you for doing that. Everybody, you have an option in the chat for all panelists and all 10 DS and just click and enter your social media handle and what site that is so that other people can just like screenshot it or whatever for later, where, where do I do that? If you go down to the chat tab at the bottom, it should already say all panelists, but if you do all panelists and attendees and you write your social media handle, all people should be able to access that pretty easily. Catherine revealed is on Facebook. So is anybody out there that wants I’m happy to give you some free time put your questions in on the Facebook page and you know, she reads scripts and she does script stuff. So every single one of these actors I imagine is writing. Now you have like an end to be like, Hey, Hester, I love your staff. You’re so smart. You said all this amazing stuff. You want to read my script and talk to me about it. Like, this is your chance to annoy her. Brandon would you like to plug what you have coming up?

Brandon Baker:

Sure. yeah. Commercial by Deli Delicious. You can always watch the Deli Delicious commercials, got a bunch of those and Satisfy Gaming. They make a grip, if you have a Nintendo switch, you need to go there anyways because they make a really cool grip for it. So I’m in those coming up. And then a couple of short films. One is a Western, I think might actually be a feature film called above snakes and then a comedy called how I raised my mother. So those are all coming out in the next title. That’s fine. I keep wanting to say how I met my mother, but it’s how I raised my mother. So yeah, those are all coming out. And then in those, I didn’t write those bins.

Jennica Schwartzman:

Please share how people can follow you so that when casting time comes up for this Western, that could be made into a feature, everybody here has access to insight info about how to get to you.

Brandon Baker:

Yeah, I put, and I put my Instagram, I, and I post things on that a lot. So at BB Brandon Baker and Instagram’s down,

Jennica Schwartzman:
Do you have anything you want to plug as well?

Vinnie Horst:

Me sure. It was Mindy. Sorry, your cup. Yes, I do. I have two things to plug. I have my YouTube channel, which is called the starting actor. You can find it at www.vinniehorst.com. That’s my name slash YouTube. And that’ll take you there. And my focus is on talking about my experience as I, as I learn the industry is I learn how to act and just my observations some tips and tricks that I learned along the way. So stuff like that. So check that out. You can also find me on Instagram at Vince Horst, V I N C E H O R S T. And a, the other thing I wanted to plug is me. I am a hungry and wanting actor and I’m really looking forward to to extending. Yeah, that’s right. Extending my my wings and flying a little bit. So if you have any work out there on your man.

Jennica Schwartzman:

Great, thank you. And thanks so much for joining us here. We were very lucky to have your time and everybody who is attending. Thank you so much. Your time is extremely important as well. And thank you for participating in the chat. We love being able to see and talk to people, and I got to see all your beautiful faces for an hour and 11 minutes. So it’s positive for me. I’m an actor and producer and writer as well. And I have a book called movie baking the indie work at home parent filmmaker, which is about the philosophies behind lifestyle obligation artistic life. And it can be applied to any type of life where you have to balance little humans or doggies or caretaking for older parents or people in your life, as well as creating art and the tips and tricks upsets all indie filmmaking stuff. So I am happy to engage with anybody online about that as well. Thank you also. Oh, Oh, Magnus is also a movie that’s coming out in the next few months called Brick Madness that he and I are both actors in brick. Madness is distributed through my company, little sister entertainment, which is an indie film feature film distributor. So thank you all for coming. Thank you everybody. And please continue to look at this chat and screenshot it right now for the next four seconds.

Hester Schell:

Great to meet everybody. I’m so happy that everybody’s working in busy. We will get through this pandemic. We will, we will get through this.

 

 

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