Our 12th webcast where we discuss the topic of directing.

 

 

Panelists:

Justin McAleece

blaremedia.net

 

Rickey Bird

www.hecticfilms.com



Jean-Luc Slagle

wearescope.com

 

Craig Teper

Travis Cluff

tremendum.com

 

 

 

Justin McAleece:
Justin McAleece here with Shoots.Video crew talk coming to you live from Fresno, California. Wow. Hey, how are you guys doing? What’s up? Good, good. Excellent. All right. So in my upper left, I don’t know how it looks on your end, but we got the man the myth, the legend Rickey Bird, and to my rights. Yeah, well, we have a Travis Cluff on the bottom left, Jean-Luc Slagle and Craig Teper below me. And then we got Chris Lofing. So yeah, super stoked to have you guys all here. We’re going to talk about directing a little bit directors here that do different things, which I think is really cool. Different like levels or different different approaches, which is, I was happy to be able to put you guys together and I think have that variety here, so let’s get right into it.

Justin McAleece:
I guess a real quick, Ricky, to give me, give me 20 seconds about what you do.

Rickey Bird:
I just make independent movies, direct and produce and then write too. So that’s pretty much it. Yeah. Whenever it takes to get it done.

Justin McAleece:
Really, you focus more on like what would you say? Sort of orient things like very, very proper things, stuff that you would want to show your parents, right?

Rickey Bird:
Yeah, totally. It’s real Christian. No. I do like naked zombie girl Grindhouse for comedy. I also have another Grindhouse movie called a Machine Gun Baby. So yeah. I lose friends, gain friends whenever I make. So, you know, you’re doing the right thing, you know, it’s good. I like it. Yeah, the, the tremendum guys over on my right here. Tell me what you guys do. No, you go ahead.

Chris Lofing:
Oh, okay. Well we’re myself and Travis with Tremendum Pictures. We do mostly narrative content. We used to do a little bit of you know, commercials and ads and stuff, but we’ve been fortunate enough to focus on movies and series. Genre wise, it’s usually in the horror thriller space, but we aim to do a lot more. And budget range is usually very low. If not nothing, if anything Travis, if you want to add anything to that, no

Travis Cluff:
Sadly it usually is very low and we, we did used to do more commercials and stuff. We’re open to that now. I mean, we do have to put food on the table and when you’re between movies, it can take forever to get stuff going and to get paid.

Justin McAleece:
Especially in this era. Yeah. So the thing we will fight to do and get those projects made packaging and actually getting anyone to sign on the dotted line and get it going is tough. John Luke, tell me what you do.

Jean-Luc Slagle:
Yeah, I’m ad I work at an ad agency and the creative director for a company called scope studios, and I direct a lot of commercials, brand films and shorter like documentaries, but yeah, firmly planted in that, the ad world, not the narrative side of things.

Justin McAleece:
Totally Craig at Tepper. I think you’re, there we go. And yeah. What do you do, man?

Craig Teper:
I am a documentary filmmaker and I also I helped the direct commercial. I’m a partner in the edit and state pub story worldwide where I’m also the creative director. Yeah. And that’s a new thing for you, right. You just, you want to throw your bus or it really got it got going kind of at the beginning of the lockdown. So it’s been perfect because I’ve been able to find, you know, figure out ways of doing virtual production and remote production and a little bit now, again, in New York back to actual onset shooting, but it it’s been great.

Justin McAleece:
Yeah. Has that made the difficult things about being a director – Has that helped any of those things or made those more difficult?

Craig Teper:
You know it’s, it’s taken away a lot of the more enjoyable parts of being a director, you know, being on set having those, having that comradery and having the relationships and collaborations with people in person, which is my favorite part and the most fun part, I think, and the traveling, which I also love. So those are gone. But you know, I I’ve, I’ve been doing quite a bit of virtual production, like in virtual environments. And I’m kind of amazed to see that even with like a VR helmet on, on a, on a virtual set, how people act the same way they do on a real set, like how, you know, the agency guys standing in the wrong place you know, there were the wrong people standing in the background of a shot and you’ve got to yell to get them out of the way. So it’s kind of weird how, how much it is. Exactly the thing.

Justin McAleece:
Wow. Yeah. People are going to be helped. People are going to be think. Yeah. yeah, Ricky, what’s difficult in your world about being a director. How, how, how are you struggling to put the money on the screen?

Rickey Bird:
Um you know, the hardest thing is usually wearing multiple hats in my range, you know, like I’m not also producing and, you know, crafty, you know, all these different things, whatever, you know, while we’re directing. So I’ve had to learn how to like, literally take the hat off and not wear all the hats while we’re directing. Cause ultimately it’s like the project that suffers, you know, when you’re not like putting all the, like, you know, like you said, everything you can on screen capturing that gold in a little box, you know? Cause no one, you never get to sit with anybody and say, Hey, you know, we were having a hard day that day. That’s why these shots look like shit. You know?

Justin McAleece:
So what do you, when you, when you’re putting together a crew, then let’s say you got a little bit extra money, you can hire one more person. What what’s, what’s the next person you would put on? Usually it’s sort of hard to say without know what your crew was, I guess, but what’s the most important person for you to have?

Rickey Bird:
I think like, as far as the team, like as far as like my department, I guess would be the,uand I’m blessed to have my wife as my ID, so it’s pretty cool that I get to say,ukinda it’s a give or take on saving and not department or whatever, but yeah, but that part, I think is the most crucial to like on like an indie set. I think,uyou know, people that are important are definitely, definitely like your gaffer and uyou know, DP and then, you know, your sound guy are very important. And then if I have extra money, I try to focus on,uyou know, maybe getting another person to help out those departments, you know, just to kind of lighten the load. So that way we’re all staying creative and not getting exhausted after a long shoot days and stuff. I think that’s like super crucial, you know, keeping that positive energy, you know?

Justin McAleece:
Yeah. Same sort of thing for you, John, Luke, what do you, if you’re going from say a three person crew to a four or five person crew, how do you add value? Who do you, who do you put on that crew?

Jean-Luc Slagle:
Yeah, I’d say it probably depends. It changes depending on the size of your production too. Like when you’re, when you’re more insulated as the director and you have other layers, your money naturally goes to different places. I would say the same thing though. I think one of the lessons that I’ve learned over time is just how important the gaffer is and having someone that can pay attention to how the scene is lit, but also the emotional implications of how the scene is lit. And you know, I think camera department always gets the bad rap for like one all the money, but I think I’ve learned I would rather spend more money on like lighting, maybe art direction, having have a good art direction rather than I don’t know the difference between like a really nice set of lenses and like a really, really nice set of lenses. You know, I feel like that money is probably better spent on art department, like pre production costumes, wardrobes, things like that have maybe a T in my world have a disproportionate effect on like final output and production value. For sure.

Justin McAleece:
Yeah. That’s one of the things when I go talk to ’em like high schoolers or college kids is I always say like, if you have the opportunity to rent another, a different set of lenses that it’s slightly better for another 200 bucks, don’t buy curtains, like shale lamp, but stuff in the background, that’s going to be super obvious. I mean, you’re going to know the difference between the lenses maybe, but other people are going to be like, Oh, not a white wall. That’s a way. Yeah.

Jean-Luc Slagle:
And I feel like the tendency, especially like early on in people’s careers, like shoot it on better cameras. We’re going to shoot this on the red, you know? And then like we’ve probably all been a part of some terrible projects that were shot on the red. And it’s like, just because you have a red doesn’t mean it’s going to be a successful project. So I think the prep work, the preproduction, the art direction, like there are little staple pieces here and there that I think you can put into a production that makes it look more expensive than it is that’s for sure. And that’s something that we’ve, I’ve tried to do, you know, I’m pretty early on in my career, but I’ve tried to do that a couple of times, like find, the one thing that’s going to make this look like a, you know, if it’s a $50,000 project, that’s going to make it look like a hundred thousand dollar project, you know? Yeah.

Justin McAleece:
It’s being, being very conscious of that. Craig, I feel like you’ve worked on probably the most expensive things of maybe the people on some of the things we worked on. Tell me the difference sort of between a big crew, a big set and a small crew, small set, and like why one would be better than the other sometimes.

Craig Teper:
Well, yeah. I mean the nature of the director’s job changes I think when, when you have a really small crew, I mean, oftentimes if it’s a really small crew, it means I’m shooting. It means I’m the DP to which you know, for an interview shoot or a small dock shoot, that’s great for a commercial. That’s not great. You’ve got other things you should be worrying about. Especially if you’re, if you’re the DP and you don’t have a good AC and you’re worried about, or you don’t have, you know, if you’re worried about the lighting, you’re worried about a major shot in focus you’re worried about, did you remember to hit, did you roll? Do you remember the role you were feeling there is if you’re the director and you didn’t roll on a good day? So yeah, so that’s, that’s a totally different job than managing a set with a lot with a giant crew and a lot of clients than a lot of, you know, it’s a, it’s a very, you spend your time doing very different things. You know and I, you know, we’ve worked together on jobs with, with, with fairly big crews and we did one child in particular with with with a ton of clients on the set. I think we had, yes. You could measure them in the dozens actually.

Justin McAleece:
Yeah. Yeah. And they probably were double the triple what we were

Craig Teper:
That’s. Right. And so that job was like, it was very political. It was like mostly a being a politician and making sure people were happy and communicating between departments and communicating between different visions and trying to keep the, trying to keep the train on the, on the track. Yes. So there wasn’t a lot of time to be creative. Yeah.

Justin McAleece:
So much of what you did. I think on that shoot was, was very much just playing with different people’s personalities and letting them all feel heard and letting them get their opinions out and all that stuff. And there wasn’t a whole lot of time to reinvent the wheel on anything. It was more just like taking all this input and letting everyone feel like they got it.

Craig Teper:
Yes. And, and that’s a, that’s a very different kind of, of, of role. I mean, I enjoy doing both. And I think the perfect situation is if you’re kind of doing half and half, where you have enough, you have enough support that where you can focus on the creative aspects that really interest. But with that support comes the kind of managerial role where you’re, where you’re dealing with lots of different personality. And I think when you’re, when you’re balancing that kind of 50 50, or that’s kind of the sweet spot. Yeah.

Justin McAleece:
Yeah. It makes me think of some stuff I’ve been through and like for the guys on the right tremendum guys I’ve been on set sometimes in, let’s say I was on a big production the week before, whatever, and you someone’s handing you ice tea whenever you want it. They’re just like, you know, there’s like the comfort, some things. And then the next week you’re like simultaneously trying to hold up the silk and you’re trying to pull focus and you’re trying to run everything at once and it sort of sucks. How do you guys have any, like come to Jesus moments where you’re like, Oh man, I thought I was something and now I feel like nothing trying to hold everything together on a shoestring. You tell me about something like that.

Travis Cluff:
I dunno. I mean, I feel like we have never had anyone bring in ice tea. That sounds glorious. We’ve had look, w our team has been great in trying to like, you know, make it feel like there are moments like that, which is great, but, but we really do work on such a smaller, tight budgets. And, you know, everyone’s participating in some way usually, or they’re, they’re going to, and that’s why we’re able to do things much tighter. And we do put a lot more into getting the scene, you know, if it’s set pieces or props or things like that. I think, I think everyone that we work with kind of realizes that, like, we want it to come out as good as it can become. And I feel like they know that we, you know, be, you know, in post we’ll do everything we can to make it look like $1 is equal to a thousand dollars. But yeah, man, we’ve been on some, you know, we’ve seen some sets, not ours that it’s like, dang, they got like assistance to the directors. Like that’s awesome.

Justin McAleece:
Assistance to the assistance. Yeah, yeah, yeah. It’s a, it’s a whole different ball game. And I think people, when they get into this business, maybe they don’t realize that it’s often going to scale to those extremes unless you’re like absolutely upper echelon people do, you are gonna run the gamut in terms of like how you, how it feels on set to have no support or total support. And it’s not the people involved. It’s just the lack of money. Lack of people

Travis Cluff:
On everything we’ve done that we’ve been understaffed on, that other people have said you’re way understaffed. But at the same time, we also realized that in bigger productions, there’s a lot of waste and people have told us, they complained that there’s like 200 people sitting around on their phones and like, what’s going on? You know, that’s, that’s a lot of money. And for indie guys, I mean, you guys on these smaller projects that really you’re completely responsible for any extra person is just like, it’s like painful to think of the cost of that. Not that you don’t want them or need them cause you do. And you’re like, I would love to have you in 10 more of you. I just can’t afford it.

Justin McAleece:
No. And that’s the thing too, is like, they’ll be like, I want to be a PA I’ll be there. And you’re like, yeah, but you’re going to park and eat and shit. And I have to account for that. And that’s hard. That’s like a lot of stuff to worry about when you add on five people, if they’re not actually contributing to what’s happening, it’s like rough.

Chris Lofing:
And with the COVID stuff now too, like this most recent shoot that Justin actually, you came and helped us with. We kept our crew tighter than I think we normally would have just because of having extra people on set. Like it was more COVID test that we had to do more people. We had to get temperatures for and like, you know, distancing. And it was a tight space and all this stuff. And it’s like, you know, that’s another factor that we now have to deal with as well.

Travis Cluff:
It wasn’t even a union thing it was just, we were trying to like, see how we, how well we would do abiding by the new guidelines, however stringent or agregious they may appear to be to producers. Of course, which I think they are, it’s a little overboard. I think a lot of actors feel the same way, but hopefully they’ll find the middle, the right middle ground to, to, you know, where people aren’t just knee jerk, reacting to it and have more data and can do things that will allow people to get back to it in a, in a good way. Still taking proper precautions.

Justin McAleece:
Yeah. I think like Craig, Craig said like people are going to be people and like, as far as the mass thing goes, like, it’s funny how you could see someone be completely hygienic and all the certain ways and then totally ruin it with some other thing. And then you’re like, wait that you’re supposed to have the thing cover the thing. Not that it’s just that, stuff’s always funny to me. The inconsistency is crazy. It, Ricky who wrote a book, what, what book did you write that just helped to write a chapter for?

Rickey Bird:
Yes. I have a book called cheap movie tricks. It’s a book that I got published through mango media. I got approached by Ryan Cook cause I’m known for guerrilla filmmaking. So it was a stretch cause I’ve only read like three books in my life. So I had to learn how to read before I could write it, huge hurdle. Um but you know, it’s a, it’s a good book. And actually now, since COVID happens, we’re selling and crafts. Wow. So that’s been great. I mean, I only get a real small percentage cause you know, I’m not really good at math. So I usually get screwed when I get my royalty check. I’m like, wow, you sold a bunch. I shouldn’t be getting, Oh wait, that’s my check. So, but it’s no cool. And it’s helping out a lot of filmmakers and it’s just a brief overview though. I think a lot of, there’s been some haters on my book saying that it doesn’t go in depth enough and I’m, it’s more or less just trying to give someone like an overview, how they could shoot their own film for a couple g’s and you know, make it work with, you know, like just the essentials you need to get it, get it shot. And the do’s and don’ts, and then, you know, I wish I can do a updated version cause I’ve read some more books and, you know, shot some more features and more short films. And there’s even more stuff I want to put in that book.

Justin McAleece:
What’s one thing you would add to it, what’s like one trick or one thing that really feels like it’s putting the money on the screen.

Rickey Bird:
Um I would say like the blocking, so what I like to do is I think a lot of things that lack in indie films, especially like we’re talking like budget rounds, like would I mess with like under five grand on a short film sometimes, you know, or like a grand or whatever, but it’s just moving and blocking with your actors. So taking your talent and you give your talent what I call business. That’s like an acting term, you know, it give them their business. So like this, one’s doing something here, the other person’s doing something over there and you kind of shift the camera around that world to kind of help tell the story. And I think that adds production value without, you know, like trying to over light or trying to, you know, like get all crazy, we’re spinning around or staying on shop forever. But that’s one thing that I would really, you know, and we’ve kind of like been working with tricks, you know, to kind of keep the camera moving, get the actor or actors comfortable in their movements and kind of like, you know, make it flow a little bit better. But that would be one major thing that I’ve learned for sure.

Justin McAleece:
Yeah. I feel like business has killed like a myth, like, like 10 million people, because back in every other decade, they’re like, I need, I need something to do. Can I get a cigarette? Can I just have a cigarette in this scene?

Craig Teper:
No more newspapers or cigarettes.

Rickey Bird:
Yeah. I know. Everyone’s just like this cool eating is another one. Like everyone will like Brad Pitt and just eating, eating, eating. He always likes to see, but that kind of stuff makes it natural and makes it, does it makes it feel like you’re peering into someone’s life instead of forcing a story upon somebody, you know, I like to like let the viewer like, feel like they’re, you know, like with them, you know, and they’re part of something like coming, you know what I mean? To kind of like establish it. And I think that helps establish, you know, the environment for your story.

Justin McAleece:
Craig. You’re doing a lot of docs and things like that. And do you need to insert those things into it to give people stuff to do?

Craig Teper:
Or is it always there just because that’s the nature of the beast. How do you make that study? It depends what kind of dog it depends. What kind of doctor making, I mean, if you’re doing a very kind of like, you know, cinema verite, direct cinema doc where you’re following action, you’re just following action, right? You’re you’re a fly on the wall kind of thing. Sure. Most of the time my approach is I rarely, it’s more common for me to make a doc about events that have already occurred. Okay. Or, or to construct a story out of something. So my approach is more like a scripted approach. So I’m, yeah. I’m trying to come up with a scenario. I’m trying to put people in a set or a scene that makes sense and furthers the story and not just shoot talking head interviews and not just follow people, doing their normal daily lives. I’m trying to construct a reality a lot of the time, like you wouldn’t have scripted. So

Justin McAleece:
Yeah. I think people don’t realize that when they’re like, I just want to watch what’s happening and you’re like, yeah, it’s going to be done. You wouldn’t like it. It’s not worth watching.

Craig Teper:
I don’t think people don’t think reality shows are made up. I mean, people don’t realize that reality shows are scripted and there are multiple takes. And you know, I think people are fairly ignorant about, I mean, I also think, you know, another thing is people are always talking to me about, Oh, where do they, where do you think they shoot that show? Or like, where do you think that apartment is? And they’re like, well, the house and breaking bad. Well, the exterior was, was an actual house, but the interiors are set and they, they, they refuse to believe it. And you have to explain to them, you can’t take over someone’s house whenever you feel like, you know, on a series. Like I think people are shocked at how many things they watch are actually.

Justin McAleece:
Yeah, yeah. Yeah. The the, this is couple of sideboards, but there’s a scene on the Simpsons where they’re shooting the fallout boy or the radioactive man thing. And Culver’s like they, they asked if we could shoot here, give us 50 bucks a day. And he’s like, yeah. I said, yeah, they come in there. They’re immediately put cameras through walls immediately. Yeah. But but yeah, you used to see on the old money Python show, when you would watch a an opera, something completely different you because they would shoot the stuff. Everything that was on a stage was on video, on everything that was, it was on film and it was

Craig Teper:
The BBC rule. BBC rules were that you could only shoot video on a, on a, in a three camera studio cameras set up on a stage. And any time you took a camera outside, it had to be 60 millimeter. So until some point in the seventies. So like even the early doctor who, and all of that are shot that way, which I love that. Look, I love the reality that interiors or video or film

Justin McAleece:
So much different. Yeah. Cause they didn’t like the film was never treated. So it’s super flat. It’s like, everything’s log, it’s just way different.

Craig Teper:
I mean different everything. Yeah, yeah,

Justin McAleece:
Yeah, yeah. Insane. yeah. Let’s see, what else more hacks, does anyone else have something that they love to do that just makes a scene that’s missing something that much better even on paper or when you’re on set? Flares, Right. Put a light student led in the lens. Yes. I know that that is over done, but there’s been a couple of times when we have twins,

Jean-Luc Slagle:
You know, our world is my world’s a little bit different than the narrative world. Um but there is, there are certain that you can do to like haze a lens a little bit, or warm a lens a little bit that often do you add just a touch of pop to something that doesn’t quite have the commercial flair. It’s not going to save a bad location or save a bad scene. But like, I think there are lots of little aesthetic choices you can make that add maybe 10% like extra Polish on top of something that feels a little bit more natural than just adding Andrew Kramer’s optical flares.

Justin McAleece:
Yeah. Well, and if you’re not editing, then who’s going, you don’t know that the dude later is going to do that, that you know, whoever.

Jean-Luc Slagle:
Yeah. Or like my favorite thing right now is to point out, like everyone loves anamorphic flairs, and you’re like, that’s not an anamorphic camera. Like I can see circular both on the background and you have an animal.

Justin McAleece:
You just put it on top of that. There’s some shots that I’ve taken pictures and put them on Instagram or whatever. And it’s like, if I have a 50 mil lens and I’m at like an [inaudible] somewhere in there, you can put gaff tape, like basically right on the lens and you never know, you can sort of do it there almost. And it just becomes like too dark and that little bit gradient filter, it’s a little bit of gradient. No one would ever know. You can’t tell at all. And it’s something that you can be at, might happen later. Someone might put it in, but I can do it.

Craig Teper:
You do the same thing with with a flashlight at the edge of the frame and do the opposite where you’re just having that little bit of light kind of create, you know, it’s kind of the positive version of the negative thing you’re creating with that gaff tape.

Justin McAleece:
Absolutely. And I think that stuff’s really useful and you pick those things up over time and you also find out when not to do that over time and that’s like a really good experience thing.

Jean-Luc Slagle:
And then the beauty of that is that now you can add a gradient filter back into a line item and add that to the fund.

Craig Teper:
Anything I like to do is, is to like, to, to not let, not make a big deal out of roles and cuts and not have people be sure when you’re rolling sends that. Like if it seems feeling really static and things aren’t happening is to try to, is to roll and not let people know it and try to catch natural behavior and try to try to get something going without all of the pressure of rolling and cutting. Sometimes that’s a great way to get things done, a life lift to be livened up.

Justin McAleece:
Yeah. A lot of times on the interviews, that’s a good thing. When you’re dealing with people who are not very experienced or maybe they’re not used to being on camera at all. Yeah, yeah. Or with kids or whatever.

Travis Cluff:
I mean, we did, we do it with kids, but we did it a lot with our first movie, which was found footage, the gallows, we have a whole slew of clips and pieces in it that we just captured, you know, there’s, you know, a couple of the, the extras were, you know, playing some game in the backstage area and Patty cake, you know, and I was like funny seeing school kids doing that. And it just, it made it in the movie. It was just a funny little part about high school life. You know what I mean? Just, you know, the drama kids doing Patty cake in the background and, and you know, but we caught a lot of little moments like that that were much more realistic because they were real, you know?

Justin McAleece:
Yeah. And if you would’ve said, Hey guys, okay. So right now we’re going to play Patty cake. That’d be like that stupid. No one would ever do that. Really dumb on camera and then right. You grab it and it works. Yeah. Yeah.

Craig Teper:
But mix and mixing those realities, mixing the more stage stuff with the more natural stuff that you capture, just create such a great feeling. I mean, I think it’s, what’s great about a lot of like seventies, American movies with directors, directors were doing that sort of thing. They were capturing a lot of natural behavior along with a scripted behavior. So that films have a certain vibe that that’s kind of gone now, but it’s a great thing to do, I think.

Justin McAleece:
Yeah, absolutely. That can, that can be some of the most true moments and those things. I was a AC on a movie in Iowa, 11 years ago. And the, the DP got mad at me the first day because I cut when the director said cut, I was on it. And he’s like, don’t ever cut you wait til I tell you to cut because there’s going to be something that happens right after that happened. Right after he said, cut. And that’ll be the best moment it’ll stay on the movie. Believe me. So like the whole rest of the time. Yeah.

Craig Teper:
Cool. Yeah, that little, that little moment where you yell action or say cuts or right after you say cutter sometimes the best little bits for an editor, right?

Justin McAleece:
Yeah. we had a, we had a question. Do we find benefits in storyboarding a film or storyboarding a project? Ricky, do you get storyboards very much?

Rickey Bird:
Um well I find benefits in it simply because like for my movie naked zombie girl, we had no script. There’s no lines in the whole movie. So I actually wrote really crappy stick figures and you’re like planning out our shot that way. So you told the story like that? Yeah. I mean another, like we did a movie called home free and we just ran around and shot stuff. So that was more of like a mumble cord style film. So we didn’t really, like, we just did like, you know, a script. So I feel like it just like depends on what kind of movie you’re going to do, or if you’re gonna try and do something special effects. Cause we have another, one of our films called video store and we actually built like a miniatures and stuff like the Bakersville bridge and this clock tower here in Bakersfield. And so we had the storyboard, a lot of that stuff out to kind of figure out what we were going to, what the things were going to look like once they were finished. But you know, I think it’s like a mixed bag mean sometimes, you know, they’re really needed. And sometimes, you know, it might be, especially like if you don’t know your location that well, you know, or you’re just writing a script and then you’re just writing it, you know, like some people just do the storyboard right after they had the script and even know where the hell they’re going to shoot it or have any confirmed locations. And that’s just a huge waste of time.

Justin McAleece:
Yeah. John Luke, I know that we get storyboards on a lot of what we shoot for you. Things that are very specific, 32nd spots and things like that. Tell me why those are so valuable to you.

Jean-Luc Slagle:
Yeah, well I think in the, in the commercial world and an ad world, I’m not the only person that has to be on board with the main idea. There’s like at least three or four other people that have to agree with the thing that we’re trying to put together. So rather than, you know, just kind of show up and try to make the assets work together. We it’s imperative that we get both the client and a lot of times there’s another agency on board and another creative director. So storyboards are like the most concise way to present the idea before hand, get everyone on the same page beforehand. And that way, when you’re on set, you can still collaborate on so many decisions that you have to make during a day. But you’re not spending unnecessary creative energy figuring out like, okay, what exactly are we trying to accomplish here? The map is very clear what we’re trying to accomplish. Now we can put our creative energy into making this feel authentic, or maybe I’m trying to get this certain moment from two people. You know, it feels like a storyboard. Does the sort of boring heads down work doesn’t have to be boring, but it does some of that like logistical work, it puts it you know, in the earlier on in the process. So on the day of shooting you can put your, I think your creative energy into what you really need to put your creative energy into.

Justin McAleece:
Yeah. I feel, I find that it also what do you want to say? It is insurance for what you’re doing because a lot of times, you know, the client might be like, Well, I thought we were going to get this. And we’re like, yes, sir. Right here, it’s the, we agreed that we’re doing that. We want to change it.

Jean-Luc Slagle:
And a lot of times we want to stick more stuff. You can grab more stuff or like, there’ve been lots of good things that I know we’ve worked on where like we had a new idea that was better than what we started with. Or like in collaboration, when you have a great crew, you can make something that, you know, the sum is greater than the parts. Right. And you want that natural, organic collaboration to happen on. But yeah, it’s like that safety net, like you said, at least we’re going to get something that’s at least this good. And if people collaborate well on set, you know, the bar can be lifted.

Rickey Bird:
It’s almost like a visual contract between you and the person that you’re working with. You know, like you have people write out words and we’re making something visual for them. And so they’re kind of like improving the story and then we’re, you know, trying to, you know, put that those pictures into fruition and allowing, you know, so definitely on that realm totally would do those. Yeah. Cause we’ve had a couple of commercials where people were really specific where they wanted to shoot in what they wanted the shots to look like, you know? And then yeah.

Justin McAleece:
Yeah. Craig Travis, anyone?

Craig Teper:
I think when it also, when the timing is really specific, that’s happening on screen action scenes effect themes, and even just 32nd spots, when you know, you’ve got to, you’ve got to hit all of the action in 30 seconds or something, you know, left like 15. Now you’ve gotta make all these things happen in 15 seconds. I think it’s really helpful to have the words for something like that.

Justin McAleece:
Totally. Yeah. Yeah. Two S three S one S two S three S and like, Oh, I know what I have to do and timelines. Yeah. Because it yeah. And, and also it, it for me too, when you’re doing playback, you end up a lot of times what ends up happening is you shoot something and it’s good for four seconds. And then the end of the last two seconds suck. And the people watching it, who don’t really understand how it’s going to be chopped are like, well, what about that thing? And you’re like, yeah, it doesn’t matter. Shut up. It doesn’t matter at all. And they’re like, I don’t like the end of that. And you’re like, it doesn’t matter that never be used. Rolling.

Craig Teper:
The only one that has the playback. Yeah.

Justin McAleece:
Are you saying you can set those in and out points and loop? Yeah. That’s all we care about.

Rickey Bird:
It’s also a bad call of actresses too, because they’re like, well, I wasn’t ready for this part. And you guys were filming. It’s like, that’s obviously not going to be in the movie. You know what I mean? You know, they’re like blowing their nose or whatever. Yeah. We’ll keep it. It’s not like notice for sure.

Travis Cluff:
Any of that in the BTS or No, No. And see an approved. No, I was picking my nose. You can’t show them. But I think for store for, for us, we do so much that it’s like on the day because our budgets are so, you know, we just, they’re just so tight. But if we have a group of people that we’re working with, that is like, Hey, whatever, let’s, let’s do all the prep together. So we all know what we’re doing and we can all, you know, make it a really great thing. And there’s time ahead of time. It’s such a great way to communicate what the shot’s going to be without having to like explain it. Oftentimes I’ll try to tell someone something, and I’m just doing a terrible job. If I can, even though the drawings are also terrible, but if I can take and do like a Eating at the table And then the boy is going to be like this, and then here’s the wide, you know, and then that’s at first. And then if we can go in and like, once we find a location and it’s like, okay, well we go take some pictures. Here we go. And this, and he’s doing the Heimlich on that person. And the kid is like, you know what the heck? And so for me, I’m a visual guy and it’s just so much easier. It’s we do that with trailers. We do that with you know, Chris, we do that with all kinds of concepts, movie concepts, and that we will pitch to, you know, other people in, in Hollywood and stuff. You know, and it’s easier for us to do that than to show them a script. Cause we’re not like great writers. We happen to be able to execute things really well from a maybe so, so scripts that we’ve done, you know, people are like, wow this is a great movie. Like I’d love to see the, and we’re like, you would have
thought the script was garbage, not as good.

Justin McAleece:
Yeah. That’s the goal. You hope that everything gets better at each step, you know, the scriptures as good as you can make it. And then during production, like some, some, some happenstance that really turns out great for you also takes place a little bit of magic. And then once you get into editing, you’re like, Oh, that thing that sucked, I can totally fix it. Now. That’s really why all three, all three

Travis Cluff:
Of the vision, I think having the storyboards to me and we haven’t done it all the time, we’ve done it a couple of times. And every time though, it’s been very helpful. And in just being able to specify what you’re expecting yet from the DP, from, you know, anyone that’s that’s on there with you and, and it helps you get, have a better shot of making the day, even though you might, when you pack it in, like we did, you might end up having to cut a couple of shots or, or call someone in clutch to get the last, maybe two shots, three shots of the day, like Justin, on that.

Justin McAleece:
No idea what you’re talking about, but tell me, tell me about working with actors about working with talent. Some like do’s and don’ts w what you guys have learned over time about what works and what doesn’t I’d say

Travis Cluff:
For, for we, again, because of budget constraints, we haven’t had a lot of time to do rehearsals, but whenever we do, man, it’s so much better. It’s so much more helpful. And the ones where we have had time is usually if it’s like my kids or like, you know, people that we know and it’s like, Hey, let’s rehearse this and we can just do it, you know, on the side. And it doesn’t have to be some big thing, but it, it helps the scene so much better. Like this thing we shot with my son, he like had his, all his lines memorize, even the Korean ones and, you know, and it, like, it turned out really good that he was the most prepared of everyone. There, there were a couple of moments where I was like, Oh, I don’t know if it was just a rehearsal, but you know, the two other actors in the scene, they, they like immediately were a thousand times better in the actual second run. But Just when it was just like, Oh, Cause it’s like, Oh my gosh, my son, because he’s the only one prepared. And if they’re not, and they throw them onlines, I, how is he going to do? You know? And it turned out he did. Okay. But they also, you know, picked it up after the rehearsal, but anytime he can rehearse before the, the main event and really get those, the muscle memory of those things into the, into the mind and body of at least the main character in the scene that will really help, you know, strengthen the, the, the the extra auxiliary characters and supporting character.

Chris Lofing:
It’s more of a time thing. I think it’s like, you don’t want to necessarily kill the spontaneity of something magical on set. You know, you don’t want to like rehearse it to death, that something unique can happen, but there’s so much time that’s when you’re on set with all these people. And it’s like, okay, let’s block through it and rehearse it and do it again. And, you know, it’s like, if you can cut down that time, you know, that’s more takes, you can get in the camera, you know, good takes as well.

Travis Cluff:
Um starting out without a rehearsal. And it’s like, Oh, shoot. Like, we got a long way to go for them to get it down where it needs to be. You cut all that out in the rehearsals ahead of the time. And then you’re kind of working with like the, just the, the cream, the top, you know, takes that you would have gotten. So, yeah, Chris, that’s a good

Justin McAleece:
One thing I would say is that comedy has a sort of different set of rules for rehearsal, for what works for me. And I find that like, if you’re doing a table read a week before, awesome, you guys get to work through it. Yeah. Trying to maybe develop some repertoire that wasn’t there, but if you’re doing, if you have them deliver two takes, like while you’re finishing lighting or any of that stuff, it can, you may never get it back. And that’s something that’s basically impossible to pinpoint what they were doing. That was funny. Cause it’s such a nuance thing in my experience that like, I don’t ever really want them to perform on any comedy thing until I’m rolling. And until I’m like, everything else has dialed it, dialed in enough to where we could actually keep it. But drama is a totally different thing and it often It gets better on the fourth take. Do you guys thrive? You’re nodding anyone else?

Rickey Bird:
I agree. What I do is, cause it usually we’re, you know, low budget working with friends, family members or whoever we can get, you know, projects vary. But what I do is I just have everyone like who’s in that scene, rehearsing that scene while we’re lighting and setting up camera and I just sit there and work with them and get it kind of vetted out. So that way it’s natural to them. And they’re not just playing jump rope with lines where they’re waiting for the next person to say the lines. And that’s what happens a lot of times as actors get caught or married to a version of the character that they’ve been practicing in the mirror forever. And I try to shake that off of them after a few, because usually I’ve noticed when we’re filming about three or four takes in any shot, unless it’s like something super simple. Um I don’t get the performance I want. So it’s better to just get those irons, you know, kind of ironed out. But on the comedy realm, I get what you’re saying. Cause like on border brothers we would have moments. And then what happens is we try to artificially create those moments again. And I think that’s what makes reality TV for me. So stale is you have people trying to recreate, you know, those kinds of moments in reality television. And I think you’re right. You know, it’s probably better, especially like if it’s a really important scene, but any kind of dialogue, just because it’s, so I think indeed another thing is like people, actors sounding natural is letting them say it over and over again in that space, you know, I’m letting them feel comfortable. So that way, because you know, that’s what we’re trying to do where like, you know, zookeepers trying to make the habitat look know or whatever, You know, so we can have that, you know, no on the lines and they’re like, Oh, well he didn’t say his underline, what doesn’t matter? You know, just, flow, have a conversation.

 

Craig Teper:
Yeah, I think there’s a danger and a danger in comedy when you see something that works and then telling the actor what it was and recreate it once they know what it is, it becomes helpful to do. So sometimes you’re just giving directions. Like you’ll just, Oh, just do it faster or just do it again. Or do you know? And you’re just trying to create a pace or just trying to create an atmosphere where it can happen again. Cause you can’t make it happen. Right. So, you know, you’ll, you’ll be just like, do it again, do it again, do it. And the crew’s looking at you, like you’re crazy and you don’t know what you want, but you’re just trying to trigger that magic Or you’ll destroy it.

Justin McAleece:
Oh man. It’s so fleeting. It’s, it’s the most impossible thing to grab again. And you knew it during rehearsal dinner. You weren’t rolling. That’s do that again.

Jean-Luc Slagle:
To your point, Craig, and I think Ricky, you kind of said it earlier, but it’s almost like the better part of directing is you you’re, you’re creating this like obstacle course for people to run through. And I think it’s easy, especially in commercials, but I’m sure narrative work too to like fall into the leg, do it like this kind of trap. And yeah. And I think that’s something I kind of saw early on in the commercial scene. I was like, ah, that’s very, as soon as you start doing that, it’s like very ineffective and very stale. Yeah. It seems so much like you get stuff that’s so much more natural and interesting to watch when as the director, you just kind of create these set of circumstances and then people do things in those circumstances. And then you’re more of just like an arbiter curator where you’re like it means to go quicker or like you’re standing in the wrong spot, but it’s more like as a director you’re responsible for creating the artificial scenario and then just letting humans do the things that they do.

Justin McAleece:
It’s in line reads is sort of what you’re talking about. And you know, the best explanation I have for that is like giving an actor a line read is hopefully they’re a better actor than you are. That’s why you hired them to be actors. And all it is is you as not a great actor saying a thing and then they’re supposed to do their own version of you, you as a bad actor. And they’re probably not great at doing impressions. So their impression of a bad actor, that’s what you want on screen. Like that’s never going to work.

Craig Teper:
I consider having to give someone a line reading like a failure of mine. Like I consider that like my failure to communicate or my failure to create an environment or my failure to express what we’re after. Unless, and it’s happened a few times where I’m working with very, very seasoned actors, very experienced actors and they we’re trying to get this, like, especially for a commercial. You’re trying to say the name of the product. You’re trying to deliver some ingredients or something. That’s really hard to get out naturally. And let’s just give me a reading for that. Other than that, I consider that to be like, I really screwed up if I’m giving an actor alignment

Justin McAleece:
And it’s, it’s the thing that when you’re getting started, you haven’t had that much experience being an actor, a director, it’s the thing you assume you’re supposed to do

Craig Teper:
Well, cause that’s what they show you in movies, director doing that. Oh, that’s the director’s job. Okay. And it’s the opposite. I think of the directors. Yeah.

Justin McAleece: It’s really weird.

Jean-Luc Slagle:
I think the danger though, is that you can do the equivalent of that to any role on set. You know, you can like think, you know, more than under, but then you’re the gaffer and like, you know, Oh, step up that light, you know, another two feet and it’s like, it’s, it’s so much better to engage people on this is what we’re trying to accomplish, helped me accomplish that thing rather than to you know, take the like authoritarian role, which I’ve, I’ve seen in the ad world, you know, probably more than the narrative world. I’m not sure, but it does seem like there’s a tendency for some people to like want to dictate their visions through each department. And it seems like it’s so much more effective and you get a better end product when you’re able to like cast vision, but then let people who are professionals at their job, let them do their job.

Craig Teper:
You’re going to get, you’re going to get the credit for it. Anyway, everyone’s going to say, You know what I mean? Like let them do it. Totally.

Justin McAleece:
Yeah, totally. It’s like the, as a writer, because when you’re writing, you’re not supposed to put in camera direction necessarily or like editing directs or anything. Like if you’re doing it for yourself, that’s one thing. That’s like an internal note. But if you’re writing for someone else, you’re not supposed to do that. So the writer’s job in my estimation is to like, be so clear as to have the director know exactly what to do in those moments to execute that most properly. Right. And then the same thing when you get the actors is you want to be so clear in creating the world and in describing the situation for their character or whoever it is so that they can most properly execute that. And then as an editor, hopefully you’re constructing a scene in such a way that it is so clear what, what is happening in this scene? What is about that? The audience can then construct their perfect version and understand exactly what is happening and why, but you’re never telling them what to feel or what to think. You’re just treating the situation so that then they can make their best decisions. That’s the way I approach that. Any, any more thoughts on that? Or should we go to composing? We have a question about from a composer, how do you find composers for your projects and how can composers pitch their music to you?

Craig Teper:
How do you find producers that’ll give you enough money to hire a composer?

Rickey Bird:
I just get random, I get random messages on Facebook constantly from composers and that’s how I pick them. No, not really. I get that. It’s like, it’s almost like, you know, you get that weird mail and then you’re, Oh, here’s another composer. But yeah. I feel like it’s a hard game because you know, it’s like you know, as technology gets easier and more attainable for more people, you know, it makes other people come into a space and make it, you know, like kind of you, you drown out all the other people. But usually I have friends that I use that I like, or, you know, whatever company I’m using you know, get the stuff or we go on to like, you know, sites and get our own crap, you know, like corporate videos or whatever, getting something from, you know, audio blocks or, you know, something like that. But yeah,

Jean-Luc Slagle:
A good approach for like modern composers, maybe that don’t have quite as many large scale gigs would be to like, try to get your music on film supply, or a music bed, or like try to get into the licensing game. Cause I think for us, for sure, for advertising, the majority of commercials, even larger ones are not necessarily building it from scratch every time they’re taking out a license. And if you get one of those, like that’s a crazy good gig. Yeah. What used to be honest thing was when soundtrack pro verse came out and

Justin McAleece:
You heard the same music and the same new heard all these little stupid things that were under garage, like it’s a footstep.

Craig Teper:
Yeah. A big budget stuff too hilarious. Like, you’d be like, I’ve used that crappy loop before. Yeah. I get, I hear it with wind a lot. Like are certain wind sounds that I’ve used for a loop or whatever. And you’re like, Oh yeah, I know. That’s that wind zone somewhere. There’s a, [inaudible] that one? There’s this one audio clip of kids laughing. Yeah.

Jean-Luc Slagle:
Yeah. It’s in like every commercial, every state

Craig Teper:
It’s like a Manheim screen.

Chris Lofing:
I was about to say our sound designer actually has the original recording of the Wilhelm scream. And he played it for us when we were mixing our movie and you can actually hear the director directing the guy through different takes. It’s a series of tapes and you hear all of them. And then the final direction you hear the director in the background. He’s like, no, no, no. More of like a scream of pain. And then the guy’s like, it’s the one, you know, it’s right there. One of the best. Yeah. Yeah. It works. That’s great.

Justin McAleece:
Um yeah. Let’s, let’s end on a high note. What’s the biggest mistake you made as a director? What’s the, what’s the dumbest thing You did?

Rickey Bird:
Every time I show up on the set? I don’t know. I’ve done a lot of dumb stuff. Yeah. We’ve, we’ve taken stuff where I’ve been totally off. Like, I’ll get a phone call or like, or telling someone to shut all their phones off we’re right in the middle of the tape, but it’s like my alarm, so it’s my phone silent, but it’s my alarm. It’s what’s happened to me more times than not, but I need alarms to remember, to do certain things so silent, but yeah, exactly. Oh, cool. I’m doing it. Good job. Sorry. Thanks for the reminder. We’re rolling. Yeah.

Jean-Luc Slagle:
I think one lesson that I’ve learned, maybe not at one time, but like slowly over lots of projects is w when edit, when you’re in any sort of collaborative environment and you’re in any degree of control, I think it’s always so much more effective to communicate and make decisions about the merit of the thing and not about this personality or that personality. And I think it’s really easy to let our language go there in subtle ways. Like, nah, let’s not do it like that. I don’t like it like that. You know? So when you’re
talking to a DP, like, I don’t really like that lens. You know, there’s no real merit in that argument, but when you say like this lens doesn’t achieve what this project needs in that particular moment, it’s not about me versus the DP. It’s about what the project itself needs. And I don’t think I had any, I’d never had any big explosive confrontation with another person, but any time that you’re in a collaborative environment and you make decisions on like a personal level, I think it’s a net loss for the production. For sure. Yeah. I always tell offset from time. Yeah. Yeah. The relationship between you and other people, or.

Justin McAleece:
When I’m talking to, to be a producer, someone who might not fully understand how this stuff works, I’m always trying to default, Well, it works usually in this way to do this. Or people find that when they want to accomplish this thing, they usually make it, this was the correct approach. Yeah. Yeah. You don’t say like, I like, it’s always like other people, like, and they’re like, Oh, I like other people that sounds like a good idea. Cause that’s the passive aggressive. Yeah, no, I try to go aggressive, aggressive. Yeah. What were you saying, Chris?

Chris Lofing:
Going off of what Jean-Luc said at least for movies, especially, you know, you’re on set with the same group of people for, you know, day after, day after day. And another mistake that we’ve, we’ve learned to, you know, that has happened to us, but thankfully we’ve resolved it in previous things is if there’s a confrontation between a couple people on set or a group of people or having some kind of issue and they just didn’t bring it to us just because they don’t want to bother us. We still have to know about it. We still don’t get that resolved. We can’t have that tension on set and people, you know, at each other’s throats behind the scenes or in front of the scene sometimes. And so resolving that stuff, talking it out, getting everyone on the same page, whatever drama or, or, or conflict there is. It’s like, you got to squash that you can’t let it ruin your set. It’ll put a bad taste in your mouth at the end of every day. And

Travis Cluff:
Oftentimes it’s a misunderstanding of what the person is saying or their personality type. It’s like men, they, why are they saying that to me, it’s garbage. And you don’t realize that the person is like the person saying it is not a very tactful person. You have to like understand that they were maybe like the person with glasses in elementary school. They were like, wow, you not doing it. And you’re like, Oh, that helps me understand where they’re coming from a lot better. And then that person’s like, Oh, I sound mean when I say that, so you kind of go out, you can just be upfront with people. We’ve we’ve had times where it’s like, Hey, what you’re saying right here sounds really mean to other people. Yeah. I know you’re not being mean, but you sound to me. Right. We’re like, Oh crap, that’s a problem. No, but so just work on that. And then the other person’s like, Oh, you mean you weren’t trying to be mean, Oh, okay. I guess we’re friends now. And you know, for us, like Chris was saying like, you gotta get that stuff right away. If it festers and you don’t know about it, like it’s like, Oh crap. Yeah. And then we had to fire one guy on the, on the last day, the last day of, of gallows. And he was he was a gaffer and, and I guess he’d been a con everyone. He was, he was an LA guy up in Fresno and everyone had complaints about him and we just didn’t realize. And then he said something that was just totally rude and disrespectful. And I heard it and I was like, see ya.

Justin McAleece:
I heard it. I heard about him on day two. And I wasn’t even on the set. I had nothing to do with them.

Travis Cluff:
There you go. There you go. I appreciate being sheltered from that, but

Justin McAleece:
We only got a couple of minutes left, but we’re going over, like, why do you do this? Like, why are you still a director after all this sort of rigmarole, trying to get what you want and not have enough money and deal with people that might not be good at acting all the time and having to deal with all these other personalities and try to accomplish something. Why do you do it? Ricky Bird?

Rickey Bird:
I’m a complete idiot. Hi, my name is Ricky. No, I just love directing. I love making movies. It’s my life. So I, you know, if I, if I’m not doing this, I don’t want to do crap, but I think it’s all worth it. You know, it’s fun. And you know, it’s like, you know, they’re talking about, you know, there’s a diverse amount of people. You get to learn stuff from all different walks of life. I would, you know, I wouldn’t trade that for anything. And we entertain people that are having crappy lives or whatever they want to escape when we get to like, kind of create worlds for them to go to. So I think that’s like, you know, we’re doing the Lord’s work.

Justin McAleece:
Yeah, no, it is. There’s something about Rickey that just being on his sets and everything is like, there might not be it not even throwing you under the bus or any of this, not enough food or maybe there’s, there’s certainly not enough money or you’re acting or working overtime or whatever. It happens to be like stuff that none of us want to happen on stuff, but end up happening on really low budgets. But like at the end of the day, you’re like, you have it just Rickey, just, he just loves making movies, man just wants to make the damn thing. And if that’s like an infectious thing that always you’re like, I don’t want to go do that. And it’s going to, and you’re like, yeah, it’s Ricky fine. We’ll go. Let’s do it. Yeah. I sucker in a lot of people that way. It’s the baby Brown eyes this whole aside.

Justin McAleece:
Jean-Luc. What do you, what do you like? What keeps you going?

Jean-Luc Slagle:
Yeah, I think director’s maybe one of like two or three hats that I wear, but I just love the process of seeing something come from nothing and then exist. You know, the process of like this idea was a concept I jotted down in text edit, you know, and then it got storyboarded and then it’s, and I love seeing it through the stages. And now it’s something that exists that people have seen that people might’ve been influenced by and it’s in the world. And I think that’s such a cool way to have impact on people, you know, hopefully in a good way, but it’s, it’s a way that we can have impact on people in the world that I don’t think a lot of things compare to, but I just love that process of something not existing. And, and now it exists. That’s so fascinating to me.

Justin McAleece:
Yeah. I’ve used those exact words, explaining it to people in the past of like, we took a thing that there was nothing and now it is a thing tomorrow and it will be forever in one way or another. That’s true too. Yeah. Yeah. Craig, we think, yeah,

Craig Teper:
Well, yeah. I mean, it was like nothing like getting to set super early in the morning and all of a sudden, all these trucks show up and all these people show up and all this equipment starts coming out and before, you know, it, like you’re, you’re making the thing out of nothing. It’s just, it’s the best. But it’s also, it’s a combination of all the things that I’m really interested in in life. I mean, it’s a combination of storytelling and music and visual art and, you know, interpersonal relationships and all wrapped up in one thing. And I just love all the problem solving and and I love how all of that’s wrapped. I, it’s just so amazing to like, there’s a way that you get to be on set that you don’t get to be anywhere else in life where you’re just dealing with all of this stuff and you’re in the zone and you’re not thinking about the news and you’re not thinking like negative thoughts and you’re not, but you’re just like locked in. And it’s just, it’s the best feeling. It’s like, it’s like the best version of who you can be as a person. Yeah. Yeah. It’s going well.

Justin McAleece:
That flow is something that’s really great. And it’s, it’s weird if, if I’m going on a movie or whatever, I’m going to be gone for a few weeks ahead of time, about two weeks out, I’m like, Oh no, I’ll be able to take care of it. And then once I get into the movie, I’m like, Nope, the whole world’s gone. Don’t give a damn about that. I’m focused.

Craig Teper:
And you’ll go through like, you know, months and months and months, or years and years and years of hell, just to have that pit back to that feeling again for a couple of days, chase the dragon, you guys.

Travis Cluff:
For me, I would say all the things that have already been said. But also just something, yeah, something that I really like is I like it’s that end result. You know, I like seeing, I like working with talent and, and the, the, the whole thing to create a feeling that I’m hoping an audience will get. At some other point, people may watch it as it’s being constructed and not realize it’s going to be something amazing. But in my mind, in our minds, I think we see that someone’s going to have a really serious emotional response or that impact of the genre. We’ve talked about it to this very moment. And then they’re going to laugh at this moment and then plotting that out and actually being able to see that come to fruition in a theater or someone getting scared in a certain moment, or someone crying at a certain moment, or someone feeling like, Oh my gosh, I remember my first kiss in a moment, you know you know, w it’s going to remind them of things in their own life, but actually you can tangibly feel that almost, it’s almost like you can cut through it in the theater now when it’s not working, that that’s the thing. But when it is working that kind of stuff, man, that’s what the year and a half, two, three, four years that it takes to get a movie done and in the theaters. And then you feel that that’s the reward and to have the entire crew that came along with you feel that same thing and understand that and be proud of the work that’s been done. Those are those moments are what, like makes me have to do another one and improve it and go even bigger and try to go even better.

Chris Lofing:
Yeah. My, my answer would be very similar to Travis’s. My personality actually is unlike Craig, I, the problem solving the prep, I get, it stresses me out, man. Like I, I freak out on set. Like it’s, it’s, it’s both a rush and both the worst thing, like I’m experiencing all at the same time. But, but just like Travis, I can’t, I can’t deny the, the joy of the end product and seeing people watch what we’ve created. There’s nothing like that feeling. It’s what made me want to get into movies in the first place I made a film, I showed it to my friends. They loved it. And I said, well, okay, I got to keep doing this. And so that’s, that’s always kept me going. And I think it will always keep me going and us going is, is what the audience’s reaction will seeing that and feeling that is a, is like no other thing.

Justin McAleece:
Totally. Okay. Well that wraps it up for us. Thank you guys so much for being I guess real quick. Where, what do they find you, Ricky?

Rickey Bird: www.hecticfilms.com

Justin McAleece:
Good. Travis, Chris, where do they find you guys?

Travis Cluff:
@Tremendumpics On all the social media places or www.tremendum.com.

Justin McAleece: Nice, Craig?

Craig Teper:
Film work is at parentheticalpictures.com. The advertising agency I’m with is Story Worldwide.

Justin McAleece:
Yeah, very nice. Jean-Luc?

Jean-Luc Slagle:
I’m at Scope Studios. It’s wearescope.com

Justin McAleece:
Nice. And I work for www.BlareMedia.net. So you can find me there @JustinMakesMovies on some other stuff. So that’s it for this episode of www.Shoots.Video crew talk. We will talk to you guys later. Thank you.

 

 

 

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